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I know that technically all three ways below are valid, but is there any logical reason to do it one way or the other? I mean, lots of things in c++ are "technically valid" but that doesn't make them any less foolish.

int* someFunction(int* input)
{
    // code
}  

or

int *someFunction(int *input)
{
    // code
}

or

int * someFunction(int * input)
{
    // code
}

I personally think the third one is annoying, but is there a "correct" way? I am typically more inclined to use the first one (as the second looks more like it's being used as the dereference operator - which it isn't)

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This is duplicate of a question asked yesterday (and closed because it was subjective) about the pointer star position. stackoverflow.com/questions/377164/… – Tronic Mar 2 '10 at 22:13
    
oh wow... I searched for quite awhile to avoid a dupe... ok, deleting – advs89 Mar 2 '10 at 22:16
    
ok, apparently it won't let me delete it. someone else with more rep can feel free to do it... – advs89 Mar 2 '10 at 22:17
1  
You forgot int*someFunction(int*input). – fredoverflow Mar 2 '10 at 22:17
3  
@FredOverflow: ARGH, MY EYES!!!1 – moatPylon Mar 2 '10 at 22:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted

All are equivalent. Choose the flavor that suits you best. Just be sure whichever you chose, you apply that choice in every case. Where your stars and curly braces go is far less important than putting them in the same place every time.

Personally, I prefer int* someFunction(int* input);, but who cares?

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1  
I figured that would be the general consensus, but I feel like whoever originally came up with it probably intended for it to be one particular way... I'm just curious which one. – advs89 Mar 2 '10 at 22:15
1  
K&R C uses the second. See lysator.liu.se/c/bwk-tutor.html#pointers – Matthew Flaschen Mar 2 '10 at 22:17
1  
Stroustrup says that C++ programmers often use the first. I have been known to use the third. Go figure. www2.research.att.com/~bs/bs_faq2.html – John Dibling Mar 2 '10 at 22:22
1  
@Matthew & @John: that's exactly what I was looking for... thank you – advs89 Mar 2 '10 at 22:29

It's a question of personal taste. I prefer the 1st approach, whereas the old-school programmers tend to use the 2nd (coming from the old good C times).

For a difference, consider the following:

int* p, q; // here p is a pointer to int, but q is just an int!

The attractiveness of the first way (int* p) is that it reads as "int pointer is a type of p", whereas the alternate int *p reads as "int is a type of *p" (which is also correct).

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Why did nobody upvote this (apart from me)? – Daniel May 27 '13 at 12:23

I personally use the second option, because int *p1, p2; is better looking and less confusing than int* p1, p2; or int * p1, p2;. The same with functions' return type to keep the same style.

It's a personal thing, there isn't any 'good' or 'bad' way.

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All are equivalent. I like the third because it makes the * stand out. Other people differ.

If you're working on a project with others, use the established style. If not, decide on your own style.

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There's no "one correct way". It is all a matter of personal preference.

The first approach is not generally compatible with having multiple declarators in one declaration, so people who use it usually don't use more than one declarator in a declaration

int* p, b; // misleading, since `b` is `int` and not `int*`

Yet the first approach has its supporters.

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I prefer the second, for the reasons explained in my previous answer. *someFunction(someInput) has type int.

EDIT: Kernigan and Ritchie definitely intended the second. See for instance this snippet from the white bible.

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