Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I have a class (extract):

class Package
{
private:
        string s_package_name;
        float f_boottime;
        float f_bytesize;
        list <Package> l_depends;
        list <Package> l_selects;
}

I'd like to generate many objects and list them in a unique "array", therefore i took set I add the objects like this:

set<Package> l_tempSet;   
Package PackageA(1, 11, "what a package");
Package PackageB(2, 22, "what a 2nd package");

l_tempSet.insert(PackageA);
l_tempSet.insert(PackageB);

When compiling I receive an error Message:

no match for »operator<« (operand types are »const Package« and »const Package«)

When clicking into the Error Message it points me to the set.h to the line where unique is called and I think this is the error.

Is it true that C++ isn't capable to "unique" objects (like in this example) into lists and sets and can just handle easy data types like int, float etc. ? Or did I went wrong somewhere, please help me I'm not sure where the error is exactly.

Thanks for your suppport

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by juanchopanza May 15 at 8:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Implement the operator< for your class –  Theolodis May 15 at 8:00
    
Can you please explain a little bit more. (Do you have any search-tags to google arround?) –  user3085931 May 15 at 8:04
1  
I have added a reference for each solution in my answer. –  Theolodis May 15 at 8:10
    
If yor question is answered, you should make sure to mark an answer as accepted, for future reference. –  Theolodis May 15 at 8:20
    
I suspect you don't want to add copies of the objects as you are trying to. Remember, C++ has value semantics for everything. –  Jan Hudec May 15 at 8:23

3 Answers 3

The problem is, that a c++ std::set is orderd, therefore it needs to sort the elements by evaluating the operator<.

Basically there are three solutions to your problem:

  1. Implement the operator< for your class (see more here)

    bool operator<(const Package& other) {
        //return true if this < other
    }
    
  2. Use an unsorted set like std::unordered_set, but then you'll have to implement the equality operator and a hash function.

  3. Implement a comparator function and pass it to the set as second template parameter:

    bool smaller (const Package& left, const Package& right) 
    {
        //return true if left < right;
    }
    std::set<Package,std::function<bool(const Package&, const Package&)>> newSet (std::function<bool(const Package&, const Package&)>(smaller));
    
share|improve this answer
1  
If you go with an unordered_set, you then have 2 problems. You have to implement a hash function, and an equality operator. –  Benjamin Lindley May 15 at 8:15
    
@BenjaminLindley that is true, I added it in the answer. But it does still solve the operator < problem ;) –  Theolodis May 15 at 8:22
1  
It doesn't have to evaluate operator<. You can instantiate a set with your own comparison logic (in the form of a user defined functor). This is a good strategy to use if there is no natural operator< for your class. –  juanchopanza May 15 at 8:24
    
@juanchopanza sounds like a good idea with an own compare-value. But I guess this doesn't solve the "unique" problem. –  user3085931 May 15 at 8:30
    
@user3085931 It does. –  juanchopanza May 15 at 8:31

You have to define operator< for your class. Otherwise, set cannot compare objects it's supposed to store, thus cannot check their uniqueness.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the only answer that addresses the question of what uniqueness actually means. –  Kerrek SB May 15 at 8:22
    
@KerrekSB with the caveat that you don't have to define operator<. –  juanchopanza May 15 at 8:32
1  
@juanchopanza: Yeah... it would be best to start logically with "what does it mean to be unique", and develop possible solutions from there. Oh well. –  Kerrek SB May 15 at 8:37

When you use std::set, internal implementation may use operator < to arrange objects into buckets, RBTree etc.(Because std::set is ordered) So it needs operator <. Compiler doesn't provide comparision operator by default, so you need to implement 1 by yourself.

class Package
{
private:
        string s_package_name;
        float f_boottime;
        float f_bytesize;
        list <Package> l_depends;
        list <Package> l_selects;
public:
        bool operator <(const Package &t) {
          /* your logic */
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for (all!) of your quick responses. I googled a bit around I couldn't find anything. I think I understood the logic behind it but I'm not quiet sure about the implementation: what is exactly in the body of the bool operator and what's the "&t" –  user3085931 May 15 at 8:15
    
&t means t is a reference. About body, you can put any logic that can tell whether 1 object is less than other or not. –  Mohit Jain May 15 at 8:19
    
Don't blame the compiler. It's just doing what it's told. The language does not allow it to invent operator overloads. –  Kerrek SB May 15 at 8:22

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.