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I found this character while reading some blog of pl sql << some text >> .

I found this character from following blog http://www.oracle-base.com/articles/8i/collections-8i.php

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's often used to label loops, cursors, etc.

You can use that label in goto statements. Else, it is just 'comment'.

Sample from Oracle:

DECLARE
  p        VARCHAR2(30);
  n        PLS_INTEGER := 37; -- test any integer > 2 for prime
BEGIN
  FOR j in 2..ROUND(SQRT(n)) LOOP
    IF n MOD j = 0 THEN -- test for prime
      p := ' is not a prime number'; -- not a prime number
      GOTO print_now; -- << here is the GOTO
    END IF;
  END LOOP;
  p := ' is a prime number';
<<print_now>> -- << and it executes this
  DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(TO_CHAR(n) || p);
END;
/
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1  
Else, it is just 'comment'. Label is not a comment. Yes, one might use it as one in one way or another, but this is not labels are there for. Labels are PL/SQL scope and visibility identifiers and the means to perform unconditional branching(as you've demonstrated). –  Nicholas Krasnov May 15 '14 at 10:10
1  
The documentation has an example of using labels to break out of different levels of loop, and other references to uses for labels in the same chapter. (Just as further examples, not with reference to the 'comment' discussion). –  Alex Poole May 15 '14 at 10:15
1  
@PatrickHofman - yes, I wasn't referring to the 'comment' thing, I agree with you that they can be used like that, and are in the example. Whether that's a slight abuse of there purpose is a separate discussion *8-) It was just to give the OP more examples. –  Alex Poole May 15 '14 at 10:21
1  
@NisarMohammed: You are. OP (original poster) –  Patrick Hofman May 15 '14 at 10:30
1  
With regard to that particular example OP has provided, yes, those labels seem to be acting as comments. @NisarMohammed But it should be kept in mind that labels are identifiers and adhere to naming rules of identifiers(simply put 1label_name would not be a valid label name). –  Nicholas Krasnov May 15 '14 at 11:41

As others have said, <<some_text>> is a label named "some_text". Labels aren't often used in PL/SQL but can be helpful in a variety of contexts.

As an example, let's say you have several nested loops, execution has reached the very inner-most level, and the code needs to exit from all the nested loops and continue after the outer-most one. Here a label can be used in the following fashion:

<<outer_most_loop>>
LOOP
  ...
  <<next_inner_loop>>
  LOOP
    ...
    <<inner_most_loop>>
    LOOP
      ...
      IF something <> something_else THEN
        EXIT outer_most_loop;
      END IF;
      ...
    END LOOP inner_most_loop;
    ...
  END LOOP next_inner_loop;
  ...
END LOOP outer_most_loop;

-- Execution continues here after EXIT outer_most_loop;

something := something_else;
...

Next, let's say that you've got some code with nested blocks, each of which declares a variable of the same name, so that you need to instruct the compiler about which of the same-named variables you intend to use. In this case you could use a label like this:

<<outer>>
DECLARE
  nNumber  NUMBER := 1;
BEGIN
  <<inner>>
  DECLARE
    nNumber  NUMBER := 2;
  BEGIN
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('outer.nNumber=' || outer.nNumber);
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('inner.nNumber=' || inner.nNumber);
  END inner;
END outer;

Labels can also be useful if you insist on giving a variable the same name as a column in a table. As an example, let's say that you have a table named PEOPLE with a non-nullable column named LASTNAME and you want to delete everyone with LASTNAME = 'JARVIS'. The following code:

DECLARE
  lastname VARCHAR2(100) := 'JARVIS';
BEGIN
  DELETE FROM PEOPLE
    WHERE LASTNAME = lastname;
END;

will not do what you intended - instead, it will delete every row in the PEOPLE table. This occurs because in the case of potentially ambiguous names, PL/SQL will choose to use the column in the table instead of the local variable or parameter; thus, the above is interpreted as

DECLARE
  lastname VARCHAR2(100) := 'JARVIS';
BEGIN
  DELETE FROM PEOPLE p
    WHERE p.LASTNAME = p.lastname;
END;

and boom! Every row in the table goes bye-bye. :-) A label can be used to qualify the variable name as follows:

<<outer>>
DECLARE
  lastname VARCHAR2(100) := 'JARVIS';
BEGIN
  DELETE FROM PEOPLE p
    WHERE p.LASTNAME = outer.lastname;
END;

Execute this and only those people with LASTNAME = 'JARVIS' will vanish.

And yes - as someone else said, you can GOTO a label:

FUNCTION SOME_FUNC RETURN NUMBER
IS
  SOMETHING       NUMBER := 1;
  SOMETHING_ELSE  NUMBER := 42;
BEGIN
  IF SOMETHING <> SOMETHING_ELSE THEN
    GOTO HECK;
  END IF;

  RETURN 0;

  <<HECK>>

  RETURN -1;
END;

(Ewwwww! Code like that just feels so wrong..!)

Share and enjoy.

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It is a label, a subgroup of comments in the plsql syntax. http://ss64.com/oraplsql/operators.html

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Its is a label delimeter

<< label delimiter (begin) 


 label delimiter (end) >>

http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B10501_01/appdev.920/a96624/02_funds.htm

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