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In numerous places do I encounter partially qualified type names of the form FullTypeName, AssemblyName, i.e. like Type.AssemblyQualifiedName only without the version, culture and publicKeyToken qualifiers.

My question is how can one convert it to the respective Type in a minimum of effort? I thought that Type.GetType does the job, but alas, it does not. The following code, for instance, returns null:

Type.GetType("System.Net.Sockets.SocketException, System");

Of course, if I specify the fully qualified name it does work:

Type.GetType("System.Net.Sockets.SocketException, System, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089");

Thanks a lot.

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Do you have the type at compile time? If so why not use typeof(<type>).FullName, et. al? If you have the type at runtime you can use <object>.GetType().FullName et. al. Or am I missing the specific request? I get that you only want to specify a partial name, but thats really more for the loader than it is for the type system. FQNs are for disambiguating reference issues for the rare occassions where name conflicts occur, which is truthfully more often in user assemblies than in BCL assemblies. –  GrayWizardx Mar 2 '10 at 23:36
1  
I am perfectly aware of typeof() or Type.FullName. The type of the object is read from a configuration file, that is why I use Type.GetType. And this is why I am so interested in understanding how partially qualified type names work. –  mark Mar 3 '10 at 7:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If the DLL it's in isn't already loaded into the application domain (e.g. you used it), you need the full path like this, if it's already loaded, it can find it with the shorter version.

To answer your question: the second version always works, stick with it and you have one way to worry about.

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If the assembly has been loaded in the current domain then the code below usually works:

public static Type GetTypeEx(string fullTypeName)
{
    return Type.GetType(fullTypeName) ??
           AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()
                    .Select(a => a.GetType(fullTypeName))
                    .FirstOrDefault(t => t != null);
}

You can use it like so:

Type t = GetTypeEx("System.Net.Sockets.SocketException");
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1  
Thanks very much for this answer! It's exactly what I was looking for - much better than the "accepted" answer. –  Paul Hollingsworth Jul 24 '12 at 21:06
    
Just remember that this could be very slow, so dont forget to cache.. –  nawfal Dec 5 '13 at 19:31

Code working with the short form is:

    Assembly a = Assembly.LoadWithPartialName(assemblyName);
    Type t = a.GetType(typeName);

but LoadWithPartialName is deprecated, so I guess you should stick with the long form.

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