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I have become painfully aware of just how often one needs to write the following code pattern in event-driven GUI code, where

private void DoGUISwitch() {
    // cruisin for a bruisin' through exception city
    object1.Visible = true;
    object2.Visible = false;
}

becomes:

private void DoGUISwitch() {
    if (object1.InvokeRequired) {
        object1.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(() => { DoGUISwitch(); }));
    } else {
        object1.Visible = true;
        object2.Visible = false;
    }
}

This is an awkward pattern in C#, both to remember, and to type. Has anyone come up with some sort of shortcut or construct that automates this to a degree? It'd be cool if there was a way to attach a function to objects that does this check without having to go through all this extra work, like a object1.InvokeIfNecessary.visible = true type shortcut.

Previous answers have discussed the impracticality of just calling Invoke() every time, and even then the Invoke() syntax is both inefficient and still awkward to deal with.

So, has anyone figured out any shortcuts?

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2  
I've wondered the same thing, but in regards to WPF's Dispatcher.CheckAccess(). –  Taylor Leese Mar 2 '10 at 23:35
    
A friend of mine pointed this out: manitra.net/blog/dev/invokerequiredinvoke-easier –  Tom Corelis Mar 2 '10 at 23:43
    
I thought up a rather crazy suggestion inspired by your object1.InvokeIfNecessary.Visible = true line; check out my updated answer and let me know what you think. –  Dan Tao Mar 3 '10 at 0:05
1  
Add a Snippet to help implement method suggested by Matt Davis: see my answer (late but just showing how for later readers ;-) ) –  Aaron Gage Feb 15 '11 at 13:40
    
I don't understand why Microsoft did nothing to simplify that in .NET. Creating delegates for each change on form from thread is really annoying. –  Kamil Oct 15 '12 at 17:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 47 down vote accepted

Lee's approach can be simplified further

public static void InvokeIfRequired(this Control control, MethodInvoker action)
{
    if (control.InvokeRequired) {
        control.Invoke(action);
    } else {
        action();
    }
}

And can be called like this

richEditControl1.InvokeIfRequired(() =>
{
    // Do anything you want with the control here
    richEditControl1.RtfText = value;
    RtfHelpers.AddMissingStyles(richEditControl1);
});

There is no need to pass the control as parameter to the delegate. C# automatically creates a closure.


UPDATE:

According to several other posters Control can be generalized as ISynchronizeInvoke:

public static void InvokeIfRequired(this ISynchronizeInvoke obj,
                                         MethodInvoker action)
{
    if (obj.InvokeRequired) {
        var args = new object[0];
        obj.Invoke(action, args);
    } else {
        action();
    }
}

DonBoitnott pointed out that unless Control the ISynchronizeInvoke interface requires an object array for the Invoke method as parameter list for the action.

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1  
Wouldn't be better to have ISynchronizeInvoke instead of Control? (Kudos to Jon Skeet stackoverflow.com/questions/711408/…) –  Odys Jun 9 '13 at 20:15
    
@odyodyodys: Good point. I didn't know about ISynchronizeInvoke. But the only type which derives from it (according to Reflector) is Control, so the adavantage is limited. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jun 10 '13 at 12:19
    
Note: if you go with ISynchronizeInvoke, you will not be able to simply use control.Invoke(action);, as there is no one-parameter version. Only Control offers that. –  DonBoitnott Jun 23 at 17:43

You could write an extension method:

public static void InvokeIfRequired(this Control c, Action<Control> action)
{
    if(c.InvokeRequired)
    {
        c.Invoke(new Action(() => action(c)));
    }
    else
    {
        action(c);
    }
}

And use it like this:

object1.InvokeIfRequired(c => { c.Visible = true; });

EDIT: As Simpzon points out in the comments you could also change the signature to:

public static void InvokeIfRequired<T>(this T c, Action<T> action) 
    where T : Control
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5  
That's a nice trick. I'm definitely stealing it. –  Jonathan Allen Mar 2 '10 at 23:43
    
Very nice indeed. –  Ian Apr 20 '10 at 14:49
    
Maybe i'm just too dumb, but this code won't compile. So i fixed it as it built by me (VS2008). –  Oliver Nov 18 '10 at 10:02
4  
Just for completeness: In WPF there is a different dispatching mechanism, but it works rather analogous. You could use this extension method there: public static void InvokeIfRequired<T>(this T aTarget, Action<T> aActionToExecute) where T:DispatcherObject { if (aTarget.CheckAccess()) { aActionToExecute(aTarget); } else { aTarget.Dispatcher.Invoke(aActionToExecute); } } –  Simon D. Nov 18 '10 at 13:16
1  
@Offler - Well if they're being disposed on a different thread you have a synchronisation problem, it's not an issue in this method. –  Lee Jun 5 '13 at 12:24

Here's the form I've been using in all my code.

private void DoGUISwitch()
{ 
    Invoke( ( MethodInvoker ) delegate {
        object1.Visible = true;
        object2.Visible = false;
    });
} 

I've based this on the blog entry here. I have not had this approach fail me, so I see no reason to complicate my code with a check of the InvokeRequired property.

Hope this helps.

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+1 - I stumbled on the the same blog entry you did, and think this is the cleanest approach of any proposed –  Tom Bushell Apr 20 '10 at 19:27
3  
There is a small performance hit using this approach, which could pile up when called multiple times. stackoverflow.com/a/747218/724944 –  surfen Nov 29 '11 at 12:05
1  
You have to use InvokeRequired if the code could be executed before the control was shown or you will have a fatal exception. –  56ka Jan 17 at 14:28

Create a ThreadSafeInvoke.snippet file, and then you can just select the update statements, right click and select 'Surround With...' or Ctrl-K+S:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<CodeSnippet Format="1.0.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/2005/CodeSnippet">
  <Header>
    <Title>ThreadsafeInvoke</Title>
    <Shortcut></Shortcut>
    <Description>Wraps code in an anonymous method passed to Invoke for Thread safety.</Description>
    <SnippetTypes>
      <SnippetType>SurroundsWith</SnippetType>
    </SnippetTypes>
  </Header>
  <Snippet>
    <Code Language="CSharp">
      <![CDATA[
      Invoke( (MethodInvoker) delegate
      {
          $selected$
      });      
      ]]>
    </Code>
  </Snippet>
</CodeSnippet>
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I'd rather use a single instance of a method Delegate instead of creating a new instance every time. In my case i used to show progress and (info/error) messages from a Backroundworker copying and casting large data from a sql instance. Everywhile after about 70000 progress and message calls my form stopped working and showing new messages. This didn't occure when i started using a single global instance delegate.

delegate void ShowMessageCallback(string message);

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    ShowMessageCallback showMessageDelegate = new ShowMessageCallback(ShowMessage);
}

private void ShowMessage(string message)
{
    if (this.InvokeRequired)
        this.Invoke(showMessageDelegate, message);
    else
        labelMessage.Text = message;           
}

void Message_OnMessage(object sender, Utilities.Message.MessageEventArgs e)
{
    ShowMessage(e.Message);
}
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