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I am reading red-black trees in Robert Segdewick. Following is text snippet from the book.

Now, let us consider the red–black representation for the two transformations that we might need to perform when we do encounter a 4-node: If we have a 2-node connected to a 4-node, then we should convert the pair into a 3-node connected to two 2-nodes; if we have a 3-node connected to a 4-node, then we should convert the pair into a 4-node connected to two 2-nodes. When a new node is added at the bottom, we imagine it to be a 4-node that has to be split and its middle node passed up to be inserted into the bottom node where the search ends, which is guaranteed by the top-down process to be either a 2-node or a 3-node. The transformation required when we encounter a 2-node connected to a 4-node is easy, and the same transformation works if we have a 3-node connected to a 4-node in the "right" way.

We are left with the two other situations that can arise if we encounter a 3-node connected to a 4-node. (There are actually four situations, because the mirror images of these two can also occur for 3-nodes of the other orientation.) In these cases, the naive 4-node split leaves two red links in a row—the tree that results does not represent a 2-3-4 tree in accordance with our conventions. The situation is not too bad, because we do have three nodes connected by red links: all we need to do is to transform the tree such that the red links point down from the same node.

Fortunately, the rotation operations that we have been using are precisely what we need to achieve the desired effect.

What does author mean by the below statement?

There are actually four situations, because the mirror images of these two can also occur for 3-nodes of the other orientation.

An example would be helpful.

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