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The program I've written is set to only accept positive integers as input. If the user inputs a letter instead, then it crashes. Negative integers don't cause any problems, though it's not 'valid' in regards to how my program functions.

What I want to do is:

  1. Prevent the program from crashing from invalid input.

  2. Display an error message if the input is invalid

  3. Have the program continue where it left off, without affecting the rest of the program.

Also, a part of my program involves division. Is there a way to prevent the user from entering all zeros?

This is in C#

My code:

using System;

using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Text;

namespace OverallCalculator {

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        bool shouldContinue;


        do
        {




            Console.WriteLine("Enter Striking Level: ");

            string striking = Console.ReadLine();

            Console.WriteLine("Enter Grappling Level: ");

            string grappling = Console.ReadLine();

            Console.WriteLine("Enter Submission Level: ");

            string submission = Console.ReadLine();

            Console.WriteLine("Enter Durability Level: ");

            string durability = Console.ReadLine();

            Console.WriteLine("Enter Technical Level: ");

            string technical = Console.ReadLine();

            Console.WriteLine("Enter Speed Level: ");

            string speed = Console.ReadLine();

            Console.WriteLine("Enter Hardcore Level: ");

            string hardcore = Console.ReadLine();

            Console.WriteLine("Enter Charisma Level: ");

            string charisma = Console.ReadLine();




            int gra = Convert.ToInt32(grappling);
            int str = Convert.ToInt32(striking);
            int dur = Convert.ToInt32(durability);
            int spd = Convert.ToInt32(speed);
            int tec = Convert.ToInt32(technical);
            int hdc = Convert.ToInt32(hardcore);
            int cha = Convert.ToInt32(charisma);
            int sub = Convert.ToInt32(submission);

            int total = str + gra + sub + dur + tec + spd + cha + hdc;


            int overall = total / 8 + 8;




            Console.WriteLine("The Overall is " + overall);
            Console.WriteLine("Do you wish to continue? y/n? ");



            if (Console.ReadLine() == "y")
            {
                shouldContinue = true;


            }
            else break;


        } while (shouldContinue == true);
    }
}

}

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5  
Perhaps post some code so we can see where you are goin wrong... ;) Also is this C# or C? –  Dominic Bou-Samra Mar 3 '10 at 0:40
3  
And please decide on C or C# - they're completely different languages. –  viraptor Mar 3 '10 at 0:42
    
sounds like homework –  No Refunds No Returns Mar 3 '10 at 2:52
    
I wish it was. At present, I'm unable to actually go to college. It's a personal project I wanted to make, and with the help of the people here I've managed to do it. Now I want to refine it, rather than settling for the bare minimum. –  Ramses Brown Mar 3 '10 at 3:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here you go:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace OverallCalculator
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            bool shouldContinue = true;

            while (shouldContinue)
            {
                int strikingLevel = GetValue("Enter Striking Level: ");
                int grapplingLevel = GetValue("Enter Grappling Level: ");
                int submissionLevel = GetValue("Enter Submission Level: ");
                int durabilityLevel = GetValue("Enter Durability Level: ");
                int technicalLevel = GetValue("Enter Technical Level: ");
                int speedLevel = GetValue("Enter Speed Level: ");
                int hardcoreLevel = GetValue("Enter Hardcore Level: ");
                int charismaLevel = GetValue("Enter Charisma Level: ");

                int total = strikingLevel + grapplingLevel + durabilityLevel + submissionLevel +
                    technicalLevel + speedLevel + charismaLevel + hardcoreLevel;

                int overall = total / 8 + 8;

                Console.WriteLine("\nThe Overall is {0}.", overall);
                while (true)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Do you wish to continue? y/n? ");
                    string response = Console.ReadLine();
                    if (response.Equals("y", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) ||
                        response.Equals("yes", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
                    {
                        shouldContinue = true;
                        break;
                    }
                    else if (response.Equals("n", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) ||
                        response.Equals("no", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
                    {
                        shouldContinue = false;
                        break;
                    }
                }
            } 
        }

        private static int GetValue(string prompt)
        {
            while (true)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(prompt);
                string input = Console.ReadLine();
                int value;
                if (int.TryParse(input, out value))
                {
                    if (value <= 0)
                        Console.WriteLine("Please enter a positive number.");
                    else
                        return value;
                }
                else
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Please enter a number.");
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much. Seeing the solution in my code makes it easier to understand. –  Ramses Brown Mar 3 '10 at 6:07
    
You're welcome! Good luck! –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Mar 3 '10 at 13:00
int value = 0;
if (!int.TryParse(input, out value))
{
    MessageBox.Show("Oops");
} else {
    // use the value in the variable "value".
}
share|improve this answer
    
Will this work if the program runs in the command line? –  Ramses Brown Mar 3 '10 at 0:53
    
@Slateboard - the solution provided is fine except you would use Console.WriteLine("Oops") instead of MessageBox.Show() –  David Hall Mar 3 '10 at 1:10
1  
@David - did I misread the question, or should you be checking if TryParse is false in your example? –  dugas Mar 3 '10 at 1:19
    
@David Morton - agree with thedugas, your validation is backwards. I've taken the liberty of fixing your answer. –  David Hall Mar 3 '10 at 1:23
    
@David Morton (my fellow Houstonian) - one more thing, if the valid input is only positive integers, it needs to be changed to an unsigned int as a negative will allow the TryParse on an int to return true. –  dugas Mar 3 '10 at 1:26
static void Main(string[] args)
{
        bool validInput = false;
        string inputString;
        UInt32 validPositiveInteger = 0;
        while (!validInput)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Please enter a positive 32 bit integer:");
            inputString = Console.ReadLine();
            if (!UInt32.TryParse(inputString, out validPositiveInteger))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Input was not a positive integer.");
            }
            else if (validPositiveInteger.Equals(0))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("You cannot enter zero.");
            }
            else
            {                   

                validInput = true;
                //Or you could just break
                //break;
            }


        }

        Console.WriteLine(String.Format("Positive integer = {0}", validPositiveInteger));
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for giving a complete answer, including the positive requirement –  David Hall Mar 3 '10 at 1:29
    
I modified the answer to include the check for zero. –  dugas Mar 3 '10 at 1:50

Yes... before you do anything calculations, you need to validate the data you are going to use. If any data is incorrect, then you display a messagebox detailing the errors and return focus to the form so the user can fix the errors. Repeat as necessary.

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I wrote this one many moons ago when I first learned C#. It is a conversion from a VB function that I got back in VB5 days. The major benefit of the function is that there is no error - an input will just not allow any characters outside of the predefined list.

/***********************************************************************
 * bool ValiText(char inChar,
 *               string valid,
 *               bool editable,
 *               bool casesensitive
 * Description: Validate Input Characters As They Are Input
 * Notes: For each control whose input you wish to validate, just put
 *        e.Handled = ValiText(e.KeyChar, "0123456789/-" [,true][,true])
 *        In The KeyPress Event
 ***********************************************************************/
public bool ValiText(char inChar, string valid, bool editable, bool casesensitive)
{
    string inVal = inChar.ToString();
    string tst = valid;
    /// Editable - Add The Backspace Key
    if (editable) tst += ((char)8).ToString();
    /// Case InSensitive - Make Them Both The Same Case
    if (!casesensitive)
    {
        tst = tst.ToLower();
        inVal = inVal.ToLower();
    }
    return tst.IndexOf(inVal,0,tst.Length) < 0;
}
public bool ValiText(char inChar, string valid, bool editable)
{
    string tst = valid;
    /// Editable - Add The Backspace Key
    if (editable) tst += ((char)8).ToString();
    return tst.IndexOf(inChar.ToString(),0,tst.Length) < 0;
}
public bool ValiText(char inChar, string valid)
{
    return valid.IndexOf(inChar.ToString(),0,valid.Length) < 0;
}

Note That This Will Not Work On A Web APP.

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