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Having a lot of trouble getting texture maps to work in openGL ES (iphone).

Here's what I've done:

  • built an array of vertexes
  • built an array of faces that reference the indices of the array of vertexes for each face
  • built an array of colors so I can be sure I know which vertex on the cube is which.

All of this following Jeff Lamarche's tutorials. Getting the objects rendering and moving is not a problem.

Now I'm trying to get the cube (actually a tile, narrower in Z that X or Y) to stick a texture on two opposite faces (the others can come later). I have been able to get one face to work, but I am not getting workable results on any other face.

What is the most systematic way to texture map an object in OpenGL ES, and can anyone see where the errors in my code are?

#import "GLViewController.h"
#import "ConstantsAndMacros.h"
#import "OpenGLCommon.h"
#import "Cube.h"

@implementation GLViewController

@synthesize initDone;
@synthesize tileArray;
@synthesize tileRows;
@synthesize tileCols;
@synthesize cubes;
@synthesize gridOffsetX;
@synthesize gridOffsetY;
@synthesize gridOffsetZ;
@synthesize tileSpacing;

- (void)drawView:(UIView *)theView
{
    static GLfloat rot = 0.0;

    glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
    glEnableClientState(GL_COLOR_ARRAY);
    glEnableClientState(GL_NORMAL_ARRAY);
    glEnableClientState(GL_TEXTURE_COORD_ARRAY);

    // This is the same result as using Vertex3D, just faster to type and
    // can be made const this way

    static const Vertex3D vertices[]= {
        {1.0f,  -1.0f,   0.2f},
        {1.0f,  -1.0f,  -0.2f},
        {1.0f,   1.0f,  -0.2f},
        {1.0f,   1.0f,   0.2f},
        {-1.0f, -1.0f,   0.2f},
        {-1.0f, -1.0f,  -0.2f},
        {-1.0f,  1.0f,  -0.2f},
        {-1.0f,  1.0f,   0.2f}
    };  

    static const Color3D colors[] = {
        {1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 20.0},
        {1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 20.0},
        {1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 20.0},
        {0.0, 0.0, 1.0, 20.0},
        {0.0, 1.0, 0.0, 20.0},
        {1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 20.0},
        {1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 20.0},
        {1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 20.0},
    };

    static const GLubyte cubeFaces[] = {
        0, 1, 3,     
        2, 3, 1,   

        0, 3, 4, 
        3, 4, 7,        // first main face

        2, 1, 6,        // second main face
        1, 6, 5,

        5, 6, 7, 
        5, 4, 7,

        7, 6, 3, 
        6, 3, 2,

        4, 0, 5,
        1, 0, 5, 
    };

    static const Vector3D normals[] = {
        {0.200000, -0.400000, 0.000000},
        {0.400000, -0.200000, -0.400000},
        {0.333333, 0.333333, -0.333333},
        {0.400000, 0.400000, -0.200000},
        {-0.333333, -0.333333, 0.333333},
        {-0.400000, -0.400000, -0.200000},
        {-0.200000, 0.400000, -0.400000},
        {-0.400000, 0.200000, 0.000000},
    };

    static const GLfloat texCoords[] = {
        0.0, 0.0,   // texture  face
        1.0, 1.0,
        0.0, 1.0,
        1.0, 1.0,
        0.0, 0.0,
        1.0, 0.0,


        0.0, 0.0,   // texture  face
        1.0, 1.0,
        1.0, 0.0,
        1.0, 0.0,
        0.0, 1.0,
        1.0, 1.0,

        0.0, 0.0,   // texture  face
        1.0, 1.0,
        0.0, 1.0,
        1.0, 1.0,
        0.0, 0.0,
        1.0, 0.0,

        0.0, 0.0,   // texture  face
        1.0, 1.0,
        0.0, 1.0,
        1.0, 1.0,
        0.0, 0.0,
        1.0, 0.0,

        0.0, 0.0,   // texture  face
        1.0, 1.0,
        0.0, 1.0,
        1.0, 1.0,
        0.0, 0.0,
        1.0, 0.0,

        0.0, 0.0,   // 
        1.0, 1.0,
        0.0, 1.0,
        1.0, 1.0,
        0.0, 0.0,
        1.0, 0.0,

    };

      glTexCoordPointer(2, GL_FLOAT, 0, texCoords);


    glLoadIdentity();
    glClearColor(0.7, 0.7, 0.7, 1.0);
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);

    glVertexPointer(3, GL_FLOAT, 0, vertices);
    glColorPointer(4, GL_FLOAT, 0, colors);
    glNormalPointer(GL_FLOAT, 0, normals);
    glTexCoordPointer(2, GL_FLOAT, 0, texCoords);

    NSMutableArray *tempRow;
    Cube *tempCube;
    for (int i = 1; i <= cubes.tileRows; i++)
    {
        tempRow = [cubes rowAtIndex:i-1];
        for (int j = 1; j <= cubes.tileCols; j++)
        {
            tempCube = [tempRow objectAtIndex:j-1];
            glLoadIdentity();
            glTranslatef(gridOffsetX + (tileSpacing * (GLfloat)i), gridOffsetY + (tileSpacing * (GLfloat)j), gridOffsetZ);
            glRotatef(rot, 1.0, 0.0, 0);
            glDrawElements(GL_TRIANGLES, 36, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, cubeFaces);
        }
    }

    glDisableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
    glDisableClientState(GL_COLOR_ARRAY);
    glDisableClientState(GL_NORMAL_ARRAY);
    glDisableClientState(GL_TEXTURE_COORD_ARRAY);

    static NSTimeInterval lastDrawTime;
    if (lastDrawTime)
    {
        NSTimeInterval timeSinceLastDraw = [NSDate timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate] - lastDrawTime;
        rot+=30 * timeSinceLastDraw;                
    }
    //NSLog(@"rot is %f", rot);
    lastDrawTime = [NSDate timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate];    
}



-(void)setupView:(GLView*)view
{
    initDone = NO;

    tileRows = 5;
    tileCols = 7;
    gridOffsetX = 5.2f;
    gridOffsetY = 6.9f;
    gridOffsetZ = -14.0;
    tileSpacing = -2.15f;

    cubes = [[Cubes alloc] initWithRowCount:tileRows colCount: tileCols ];

    const GLfloat zNear = 0.01, zFar = 1000.0, fieldOfView = 50.0; 
    GLfloat size; 
    glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);
    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION); 
    size = zNear * tanf(DEGREES_TO_RADIANS(fieldOfView) / 2.0); 
    CGRect rect = view.bounds; 

//  glOrthof(-5.0,                                          // Left
//           5.0,                                          // Right
//             -5.0 / (rect.size.width / rect.size.height),   // Bottom
//           5.0 / (rect.size.width / rect.size.height),   // Top
//           0.01,                                         // Near
//           10000.0);                                     // Far

    glFrustumf(-size, size, -size / (rect.size.width / rect.size.height), size / 
               (rect.size.width / rect.size.height), zNear, zFar); 

    glViewport(0, 0, rect.size.width, rect.size.height);  
    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);

    glEnable(GL_COLOR_MATERIAL);
    // Enable lighting
    glEnable(GL_LIGHTING);

    // Turn the first light on
    glEnable(GL_LIGHT0);

    // Define the ambient component of the first light
    const GLfloat light0Ambient[] = {0.5, 0.5, 0.5, 1.0};
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_AMBIENT, light0Ambient);

    // Define the diffuse component of the first light
    const GLfloat light0Diffuse[] = {0.7, 0.7, 0.7, 1.0};
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_DIFFUSE, light0Diffuse);

    // Define the specular component and shininess of the first light
    const GLfloat light0Specular[] = {0.7, 0.7, 0.7, 1.0};
    const GLfloat light0Shininess = 0.4;
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_SPECULAR, light0Specular);


    // Define the position of the first light
    const GLfloat light0Position[] = {0.0, 10.0, 10.0, 0.0}; 
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_POSITION, light0Position); 

    // Define a direction vector for the light, this one points right down the Z axis
    const GLfloat light0Direction[] = {0.0, 0.0, -1.0};
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_SPOT_DIRECTION, light0Direction);

    // Define a cutoff angle. This defines a 90° field of vision, since the cutoff
    // is number of degrees to each side of an imaginary line drawn from the light's
    // position along the vector supplied in GL_SPOT_DIRECTION above
    glLightf(GL_LIGHT0, GL_SPOT_CUTOFF, 45.0);


    glEnable(GL_TEXTURE_2D);
    glEnable(GL_BLEND);
    glBlendFunc(GL_ONE, GL_SRC_COLOR);

    glGenTextures(1, &texture[0]);
    glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, texture[0]);
    glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D,GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER,GL_LINEAR); 
    glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D,GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER,GL_LINEAR); 

    NSString *path = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"a-tile-64" ofType:@"png"];
    NSData *texData = [[NSData alloc] initWithContentsOfFile:path];
    UIImage *image = [[UIImage alloc] initWithData:texData];
    if (image == nil)
        NSLog(@"Do real error checking here");

    GLuint width = CGImageGetWidth(image.CGImage);
    GLuint height = CGImageGetHeight(image.CGImage);
    CGColorSpaceRef colorSpace = CGColorSpaceCreateDeviceRGB();
    void *imageData = malloc( height * width * 4 );
    CGContextRef context = CGBitmapContextCreate( imageData, width, height, 8, 4 * width, colorSpace, kCGImageAlphaPremultipliedLast | kCGBitmapByteOrder32Big );
    CGColorSpaceRelease( colorSpace );
    CGContextClearRect( context, CGRectMake( 0, 0, width, height ) );
    CGContextTranslateCTM( context, 0, height - height );
    CGContextDrawImage( context, CGRectMake( 0, 0, width, height ), image.CGImage );

    glTexImage2D(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, GL_RGBA, width, height, 0, GL_RGBA, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, imageData);

    CGContextRelease(context);

    free(imageData);
    [image release];
    [texData release];

    glLoadIdentity(); 
};

- (void)dealloc 
{
    [tileArray release];
    [cubes release];

    [super dealloc];
}
@end
share|improve this question
    
Are the colors displaying properly? –  Rob Jones Mar 3 '10 at 18:14
    
+1 for link to Jeff Lamarche's tutorial. It's just what I needed. –  Bogatyr Mar 2 '11 at 5:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I also kick-started OpenGL ES using Jeff's tutorials.

I would suggest simplifying what you're trying to do. For example:

  • Forget the Normals
  • Forget the Colors
  • Forget the indices
  • Create a structure that binds the vertices to their attributes

Jeff provides a useful TexturedVertexData3D Struct that does this. You don't have to fill in the normal part if you don't want to.

Then, set up your strides appropriately:

glVertexPointer(3, GL_FLOAT, sizeof(TexturedVertexData3D), &vertices[0]);
glTexCoordPointer(2, GL_FLOAT, sizeof(TexturedVertexData3D), &vertices[0].texCoords);

And use glDrawArrays to draw your object:

glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, nVertices);

Once you have this working, go ahead and add the normals and colors into the TexturedVertexData3D struct, and set your texture and color pointers appropriately. Then test again, or post an update if things don't work.

At this point you can start to think about how to use indices. Indices don't really make sense until you are rendering thousands of vertices. But, when the time comes, you can get a nice performance increase by using them.

share|improve this answer
    
OK --- that's good to know. I rebuilt the project using brute-force explicit vertices, and things are working well, as you suggested using GLDrawArrays. The texture maps are working in a sensible way, and now I feel I can, as you say, incrementally improve what's working. –  omnivore Mar 3 '10 at 23:06

I've been watching this question as I'm learning OpenGL at the moment and will be moving on to OpenGL ES. As nobody has answered yet, I'll give you my thoughts, don't consider this an expert opinion though.

Something to consider is that as it stands, your Vertex, Color & Normal arrays contains 8 'items', however your TexCoord array has 36 'items'. I'm pretty sure when you use glDrawElements with a list of indices, it uses those indices to pick items from ALL of the activated arrays. So the last 28 items of your TexCoord array will never be used, they will be picked out according to the indices specified by cubeFaces. In the tutorial you linked, there are four items in all the arrays, which works nicely for a single face of an object.

However this is a bit of an issue with using indices for 3D objects, because although several vertices are re-used in a cube, their texture co-ordinates will not necessarily be the same for the different triangles they are used for. In fact neither will their normals, so that may be another issue with your code when it comes to lighting the object.

I don't know what the best solution to this is, which is why I'm interested in any other answers to this question... drawing the cube vertex by vertex is an option. I'm also wondering whether it's possible to draw each face of the cube separately, and change the TexCoord array each time. Or perhaps there is some easier or standard way of doing this kind of thing that I am not yet aware of!

share|improve this answer
    
I am coming to similar conclusions. The core problem may arise when you use an index into an array of vertices: it's not clear to me if the same indices are used to get values in the texture vertex array. I can't find any documentation on this. I'm considering now reverting to basic triangles. I'm only dealing with simple geometry, so the saving of space with a vertex pointer array is maybe not worth the hassle. Also: what I'm doing requires that I be able to map the texture to the objects faces in different ways: using triangles may be the only way to do that. –  omnivore Mar 3 '10 at 21:39

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