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I found this problem in a very large application, have made an SSCCE from it. I don't know whether the code has undefined behavior or -O2 breaks it.

When compiling it with gcc a.c -o a.exe -O2 -Wall -Wextra -Werror it prints 5.

But it prints 25 when compiling without -O2 (eg -O1) or uncommenting one of the 2 commented lines (prevent inlining).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
// __attribute__((noinline)) 
int f(int* todos, int input) {
    int* cur = todos-1; // fixes the ++ at the beginning of the loop
    int result = input;
    while(1) {
        cur++;
        int ch = *cur;
        // printf("(%i)\n", ch);
        switch(ch) {
            case 0:;
                goto end;
            case 1:;
                result = result*result;
            break;
        }
    }
    end:
    return result;
}
int main() {
    int todos[] = { 1, 0}; // 1:square, 0:end
    int input = 5;
    int result = f(todos, input);
    printf("=%i\n", result);
    printf("end\n");
    return 0;
}

Is GCC's option -O2 breaking this small program or do I have undefined behavior somewhere?

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marked as duplicate by Chris Stratton, alk May 15 '14 at 17:37

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
UB or not, I would recommend getting rid of todos - 1 and using int ch = *cur++; instead of incrementing before dereference. –  asveikau May 15 '14 at 15:52
2  
According to GDB, when compiled with -O2, todos has the value {-5632, 0} ... but I can't understand why! –  Kevin May 15 '14 at 15:55
2  
Valgrind warns about ch being uninitialized.. can't understand why –  Mark Nunberg May 15 '14 at 16:02
3  
@ChrisStratton You seem to be on to something here. When I make todo as { -1, 1, 0 } and then pass &todos[1] to f() the program yields the desired result –  Mark Nunberg May 15 '14 at 16:04
2  
so it is because of the todos-1 even though it does not derefenrence? interesting! –  Bernd Elkemann May 15 '14 at 16:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted
int* cur = todos-1;

invokes undefined behavior. todos - 1 is an invalid pointer address.

Emphasis mine:

(C99, 6.5.6p8) "If both the pointer operand and the result point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object, the evaluation shall not produce an overflow; otherwise, the behavior is undefined."

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1  
even though it gets incremented again before the derefenrence? interesting! –  Bernd Elkemann May 15 '14 at 16:10
3  
@eznme you don't have to dereference it to invoke undefined behavior, C says the addition of the pointer and the integer here invokes the undefined behavior. –  ouah May 15 '14 at 16:12

In supplement to @ouah's answer, this explains what the compiler is doing.

Generated assembler for reference:

  400450:       48 83 ec 18             sub    $0x18,%rsp
  400454:       be 05 00 00 00          mov    $0x5,%esi
  400459:       48 8d 44 24 fc          lea    -0x4(%rsp),%rax
  40045e:       c7 44 24 04 00 00 00    movl   $0x0,0x4(%rsp)
  400465:       00 
  400466:       48 83 c0 04             add    $0x4,%rax
  40046a:       8b 10                   mov    (%rax),%edx

However if I add a printf in main():

  400450:       48 83 ec 18             sub    $0x18,%rsp
  400454:       bf 84 06 40 00          mov    $0x400684,%edi
  400459:       31 c0                   xor    %eax,%eax
  40045b:       48 89 e6                mov    %rsp,%rsi
  40045e:       c7 04 24 01 00 00 00    movl   $0x1,(%rsp)
  400465:       c7 44 24 04 00 00 00    movl   $0x0,0x4(%rsp)
  40046c:       00 
  40046d:       e8 ae ff ff ff          callq  400420 <printf@plt>
  400472:       48 8d 44 24 fc          lea    -0x4(%rsp),%rax
  400477:       be 05 00 00 00          mov    $0x5,%esi
  40047c:       48 83 c0 04             add    $0x4,%rax
  400480:       8b 10                   mov    (%rax),%edx

Specifically (in the printf version), these two instructions populate the todo array

  40045e:       c7 04 24 01 00 00 00    movl   $0x1,(%rsp)
  400465:       c7 44 24 04 00 00 00    movl   $0x0,0x4(%rsp)

This is conspicuously missing from the non-printf version, which for some reason only assigns the second element:

  40045e:       c7 44 24 04 00 00 00    movl   $0x0,0x4(%rsp)
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2  
-1. This does not answer the question in a meaningful way. Except, of course, for people who can read assembly without problems. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar May 15 '14 at 16:23
    
Explained a bit more –  Mark Nunberg May 15 '14 at 16:33
    
@DanielKamilKozar it is in addition ouah's answer, so it is fine to not repeat that only add what that answer didn't say. +1 –  Bernd Elkemann May 15 '14 at 16:49
2  
It sounds like what this is demonstrating, is that the issue isn't really that the pointer is being functionally broken at runtime, but rather that the optimizing compiler is deciding that the first array element is never used (in a way that complies with the rules) and thus need not ever be initialized. Declaring the array volatile might be another experiment to try. –  Chris Stratton May 15 '14 at 16:52
    
@ChrisStratton That is very intersting. Since I dont want to add an answer to my own question maybe you would like to investigate that and write an answer? –  Bernd Elkemann May 15 '14 at 17:04

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