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I'm wondering for a while now what the best way was to do a proper clean-up after an expection has been thrown or the testcase has finished.

As a reminder: An .exe process driver process according to the implementation, conhost.exe, the browser and Java application are launched.

Using driver.quit(), we can kill the driver process, conhost and browser after finishing the testcase.

WebDriver driver = new SomethingDriver();

// do stuff

driver.quit(); // Proper cleaning

However, if an exception may be thrown, we need to do this:

    try{
        WebDriver driver = new SomethingDriver();

        // do stuff
    }
catch(Exception e){
e.printStackTrace();
}        
    finally{
        driver.quit(); // Proper cleaning
    }

What about shutting down the driver process and conhost, but leaving the browser alive? Executing a shell script is bad since it kills all the processes with these names (therefore prevents concurrent usage) and it is Windows only (I think):

TASKKILL /F /IM chromedriver.exe
TASKKILL /F /IM conhost.exe

Let's say we kill the Java process randomly (in Eclipse or task manager). How can we make sure that above mentioned cleaning takes place?

Is there a code solution which covers all these issues nicely?

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1 Answer 1

Using JUnit can help

public class JunitTest1 {

    private WebDriver driver;

    @BeforeClass
    public static void oneTimeSetUp() {
        // one-time initialization code   
        System.out.println("@BeforeClass - oneTimeSetUp");
    }

    @AfterClass
    public static void oneTimeTearDown() {
        // one-time cleanup code
        System.out.println("@AfterClass - oneTimeTearDown");
    }

    @Before
    public void setUp() {
        // before every test
        driver = new FirefoxDriver();
        System.out.println("@Before - setUp");
    }

    @After
    public void tearDown() {
        // after every test
        driver.quit();
        System.out.println("@After - tearDown");
    }

    @Test
    public void testSmthOne() {
        // the test itself
        System.out.println("@Test - testSmth");
    }

    @Test
    public void testSmthTwo() {
        // the test itself
        System.out.println("@Test - testSmth");
    }
}
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