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Can we write a c program to find out time spent in context switch in Linux? Could you please share code if you have one? Thanks

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Do you wish to measure the context switch itself or the time that you application stays suspended while the kernel is doing something else? –  Tronic Mar 3 '10 at 2:38
    
To measure the context switch itself. –  Gogu Mar 3 '10 at 3:13
    

5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Profiling the switching time is very difficult, but the in-kernel latency profiling tools, as well as oprofile (which can profile the kernel itself) will help you there.

For benchmarking the interactive application performance, I have written a small tool called latencybench that measures unexpected latency spikes:

// Compile with g++ latencybench.cc -o latencybench -lboost_thread-mt
// Should also work on MSVC and other platforms supported by Boost.

#include <boost/format.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time.hpp>
#include <algorithm>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <csignal>

volatile bool m_quit = false;

extern "C" void sighandler(int) {
    m_quit = true;
}

std::string num(unsigned val) {
    if (val == 1) return "one occurrence";
    return boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(val) + " occurrences";
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    using namespace boost::posix_time;
    std::signal(SIGINT, sighandler);
    std::signal(SIGTERM, sighandler);
    time_duration duration = milliseconds(10);
    if (argc > 1) {
        try {
            if (argc != 2) throw 1;
            unsigned ms = boost::lexical_cast<unsigned>(argv[1]);
            if (ms > 1000) throw 2;
            duration = milliseconds(ms);
        } catch (...) {
            std::cerr << "Usage: " << argv[0] << " milliseconds" << std::endl;
            return EXIT_FAILURE;
        }
    }
    typedef std::map<long, unsigned> Durations;
    Durations durations;
    unsigned samples = 0, wrongsamples = 0;
    unsigned max = 0;
    long last = -1;
    std::cout << "Measuring actual sleep delays when requesting " << duration.total_milliseconds() << " ms: (Ctrl+C when done)" << std::endl;
    ptime begin = boost::get_system_time();
    while (!m_quit) {
        ptime start = boost::get_system_time();
        boost::this_thread::sleep(start + duration);
        long actual = (boost::get_system_time() - start).total_milliseconds();
        ++samples;
        unsigned num = ++durations[actual];
        if (actual != last) {
            std::cout << "\r  " << actual << " ms " << std::flush;
            last = actual;
        }
        if (actual != duration.total_milliseconds()) {
            ++wrongsamples;
            if (num > max) max = num;
            std::cout << "spike at " << start - begin << std::endl;
            last = -1;
        }
    }
    if (samples == 0) return 0;
    std::cout << "\rTotal measurement duration:  " << boost::get_system_time() - begin << "\n";
    std::cout << "Number of samples collected: " << samples << "\n";
    std::cout << "Incorrect delay count:       " << wrongsamples << boost::format(" (%.2f %%)") % (100.0 * wrongsamples / samples) << "\n\n";
    std::cout << "Histogram of actual delays:\n\n";
    unsigned correctsamples = samples - wrongsamples;
    const unsigned line = 60;
    double scale = 1.0;
    char ch = '+';
    if (max > line) {
        scale = double(line) / max;
        ch = '*';
    }
    double correctscale = 1.0;
    if (correctsamples > line) correctscale = double(line) / correctsamples;
    for (Durations::const_iterator it = durations.begin(); it != durations.end(); ++it) {
        std::string bar;
        if (it->first == duration.total_milliseconds()) bar = std::string(correctscale * it->second, '>');
        else bar = std::string(scale * it->second, ch);
        std::cout << boost::format("%5d ms | %s %d") % it->first % bar % it->second << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << "\n";
    std::string indent(30, ' ');
    std::cout << indent << "+-- Legend ----------------------------------\n";
    std::cout << indent << "|  >  " << num(1.0 / correctscale) << " (of " << duration.total_milliseconds() << " ms delay)\n";
    if (wrongsamples > 0) std::cout << indent << "|  " << ch << "  " << num(1.0 / scale) << " (of any other delay)\n";
}

Results on Ubuntu 2.6.32-14-generic kernel. While measuring, I was compiling C++ code with four cores and playing a game with OpenGL graphics at the same time (to make it more interesting):

Total measurement duration:  00:01:45.191465
Number of samples collected: 10383
Incorrect delay count:       196 (1.89 %)

Histogram of actual delays:

   10 ms | >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 10187
   11 ms | *************************************************** 70
   12 ms | ************************************************************ 82
   13 ms | ********* 13
   14 ms | ********* 13
   15 ms | ** 4
   17 ms | *** 5
   18 ms | * 2
   19 ms | **** 6
   20 ms |  1

                              +-- Legend ----------------------------------
                              |  >  169 occurrences (of 10 ms delay)
                              |  *  one occurrence (of any other delay)

With rt-patched kernels I get much better results, pretty much 10-12 ms only.

The legend in the printout appears to be suffering of a rounding error or something (and the source code pasted is not the exact same version). I never really polished this application for a release...

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Do you have any example test results? –  Corey Sunwold Mar 3 '10 at 2:43
    
Added results of a quick test :) –  Tronic Mar 3 '10 at 2:48

If you have superuser privileges, you can run a SystemTap program with probe points for context switches and print the current time at each one:

probe scheduler.ctxswitch {
    printf("Switch from %d to %d at %d\n", prev_pid, next_pid, gettimeofday_us())
}

I'm not sure how reliable the output data is, but it's a quick and easy way to get some numbers.

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1  
+1, even if not a C program. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Mar 3 '10 at 3:09

What do you think , measuring the context switching with seconds or milliseconds or even microseconds . All happening less than nano-sec . If your want to spend that huge of time for context switching which could be measured ,then ... Try some real-mode kernel type code written on Assembly , you might see something.

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5  
So - somebody downvoted the only answer pointing out, that the "accepted answer" is complete rubbish. Expect times ~<3microseconds, and/or check the dependence on working set / and what causes the switch. blog.tsunanet.net/2010/11/… –  P Marecki Jul 28 '12 at 22:12

Short answer - no. Long answer bellow.

Context switch roughly happens when either:

  1. User process enters the kernel via system call or a trap (e.g. page fault) and requested data (e.g. file contents) is not yet available, so the kernel puts said user process into sleep state and switches to another runnable process.
  2. Kernel detects that given user process consumed its full time quanta (this happens in code invoked from timer interrupt.)
  3. Data becomes available for higher current priority process that is presently sleeping (this happens from code invoked from/around IO interrupts.)

The switch itself is one-way, so the best we can do in userland (I assume that's what you are asking) is to measure sort of an RTT, from our process to another and back. The other process also takes time to do its work. We can of course make two or more processes cooperate on this, but the thing is that the kernel doesn't guarantee that one of our processes is going to be picked next. It's probably possible to predictably switch to a given process with RT scheduler, but I have no advise here, suggestions welcome.

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Why not just this one as rough estimation?

#include <ctime>
#include <cstdio>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
        struct timeval tv, tvt;
        int diff;
        gettimeofday(&tv, 0);
        diff = tvt.tv_usec - tv.tv_usec;
        if (fork() != 0) {
                gettimeofday(&tvt, 0);
                diff = tvt.tv_usec - tv.tv_usec;
                printf("%d\n", diff);
        }
        return 0;
}

Note: Actually we shouldn't put null as the second argument, check man gettimeofday. Also, we should check if tvt.tv_usec > tv.tv_usec! Just a draft.

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1  
Guess it will estimate more of the fork() time than the switching :) –  vines Jul 11 '12 at 19:18

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