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<tag value='botafogo'> botafogo is the best </tag>

Needs match only botafogo (...is the best) and not 'botafogo' value

my program "annotates" automatically the term in a pure text:

botafogo is the best 

to

<team attr='best'>botafogo</team> is the best 

and when i "replace all" the "best" word, i have a big problem...

<team attr='<adjective>best</adjective>'>botafogo</team> is the <adjective>best</adjective>

Ps.: Java language

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2  
This can't be done reliably. Good luck coming up with a regex that even reliably matches a single HTML tag, much less things not in one. –  Matchu Mar 3 '10 at 2:40
4  
DO NOT PARSE HTML USING Regular Expressions! stackoverflow.com/questions/1732348/… –  SLaks Mar 3 '10 at 2:42
    
Can you tell us more about the context where you need this functionality? What language you're using, where you get the input HTML from, etc? –  polygenelubricants Mar 3 '10 at 2:52

5 Answers 5

The best way to accomplish this is to NOT use regular expression and use a proper HTML parser. HTML is not a regular language and doing this with regular expression will be tedious, hard to maintain, and more than likely still contain various errors.

HTML parsers, on the hand, are well-suited for the job. Many of them are mature and reliable, and they take care of every little details for you and makes your life much easier.

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1  
"While you can hack around these problems with more and more regular expression cleverness, you eventually paint yourself into a corner with complexity. Regular expressions don't truly understand the code that they are colorizing-- but parsers do." -- codinghorror.com/blog/2005/04/parsing-beyond-regex.html –  John K Mar 3 '10 at 2:42

Have you considered to use DOM functions instead of regex?

document.getElementsByTagName('tag')[0].innerHTML.match('botafogo')
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HTML parser is best, then cycle through text contents. (See other answers.)

If you're in PHP, you can do a quick solution by running strip_tags() on the content to remove HTML first. It depends on if you're doing a replace, in which case stripping first is not an option, or if you're just matching, in which case content that is not part of a match can be removed without concern.

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my program "annotates" automatically the term in a pure text: botafogo is the best <team attr='best'>botafogo</team> is the best and when i "replace all" the "best" word, i have a big problem... <team attr='<adjective>best</adjective>'>botafogo</team> is the <adjective>best</adjective> –  celsowm Mar 3 '10 at 2:54
    
Well. No good stripping, then. But I'll leave the answer for reference. –  Matchu Mar 3 '10 at 3:00

@OP, in your favourite language, do a split on </tag>, then do another split on >. eg Python

>>> s="<tag value='botafogo'> botafogo is the best </tag>"
>>> for item in s.split("</tag>"):
...  if "<tag" in item:
...      print item.split(">")[-1]
...
 botafogo is the best

No regex needed

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I was just looking for a solution to the same task, and created one that seems to do the job.

Negative lookahead is the key. To make sure the match is not within a tag, look ahead to see that the closing angle bracket is not found prior to the opening one. Suppose, we want to find a word "needle":

#needle(?![^<]+>)#i

My case is in PHP, and looks something like this:

function filter_highlighter($content) {
    $patterns = array(
        '#needle(?![^<]+>)#i',
        '#<b>Need</b>le#',
        '#<strong>Need</strong>le#'
    );
    $replacement = '<span class="highlighted">Need</span>le';
    $content = preg_replace( $patterns, $replacement, $content);
    return $content;
}

So far it works.

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