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I've read about IDisposable pattern on this article and want to implement it in my windows form application. As we know that in windows form .Designer.cs class there is already Dispose method

private System.ComponentModel.IContainer components = null;

protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
{
    if (disposing && (components != null))
    {
        components.Dispose();
    }
    base.Dispose(disposing);
}

and in .cs class I'm using Typed Dataset to read and save the data.

public partial class frmCustomerList
{
    private MyTypedDataSet ds = new MyTypedDataSet();
    ...
}

So, how to implement IDisposable to dispose MyTypedDataSet? If I implement IDisposable in frmCustomerList and implement its interface

public partial class frmCustomerList : IDisposable
{
    private MyTypedDataSet ds = new MyTypedDataSet();
    void Dispose()
    {
       ds.Dispose();
    }
}

what about Dispose(bool disposing) method in .Designer.cs?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need to dispose MyTypedDataSet? –  Ben Aaronson May 16 '14 at 0:03
    
I don't think you need IDisposable on the form. Unless you're holding a bunch of unmanaged memory, you don't need to dispose it. –  Ben N May 16 '14 at 0:09
    
Why do you want to implement IDisposable on a form? Surely you could just respond to the FormClosed event to do your clean up? –  Enigmativity May 16 '14 at 0:46
    
Just to clarify some of these comments, Form already implements IDisposable, in the Designer.cs file. Scott's answer shows you how to tie your stuff in with the Dispose method. –  Grant Winney May 16 '14 at 1:04
1  
@Willy - FormClosed (or FormClosing) would be the appropriate way. I wouldn't recommend changing the designer code to make IDisposable work. –  Enigmativity May 16 '14 at 5:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would dispose any members of the form using one of the forms events such as

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.forms.form.onclosed(v=vs.110).aspx

e.g

protected override void OnClosed(EventArgs e)
{
    base.OnClosed(e);

    if (ds != null)
        ds.Dispose();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi @Mick, why do you use protected override void OnClosed(EventArgs e) rather than private void frmCustomerList_FormClosed(object sender, FormClosedEventArgs e) ? Is there any concern? –  Willy May 21 '14 at 10:39
    
You can use either. There should be no functional difference. Subscribing to the closed event is actually probably safer as you might forget to call the base class method which will cause issues. –  Mick May 22 '14 at 2:33

If you look in the Designer.cs file and look below the dispose method you will see this

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposing && (components != null))
        {
            components.Dispose();
        }
        base.Dispose(disposing);
    }

    #region Windows Form Designer generated code

    /// <summary>
    /// Required method for Designer support - do not modify
    /// the contents of this method with the code editor.
    /// </summary>
    private void InitializeComponent()
    {

Only InializeComponent() is warned about not modifing. You can cut (not copy) and paste the protected override void Dispose(bool disposing) out of the designer file and move it in your main code file without worry, just be sure to leave the components.Dispose(); part in as any disposable objects you add through the designer will be put in that collection for disposing.

public partial class frmCustomerList
{
    private MyTypedDataSet ds = new MyTypedDataSet();

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        ds.Dispose();

        if (disposing && (components != null))
        {
            components.Dispose();
        }
        base.Dispose(disposing);
    }

    //The rest of your frmCustomerList.cs file.
}
share|improve this answer
    
Are you a cousin of Oxlade Chamberlain? –  Toan Nguyen May 16 '14 at 0:28
    
This is a seriously bad idea. Changing designer generated code is not a good idea, it's a very bad one –  Mick May 16 '14 at 3:02
    
@Mick Visual studio is desgined to handle this change. I would never reccomend changing anything inside the #region Windows Form Designer generated code region that is why they put the Dispose() function outside of the region. –  Scott Chamberlain May 16 '14 at 3:04
    
I still wouldn't touch the Designer.cs regardless of regions within the file, the file is generated by the designer. Changes to the file can easily be lost and there are other ways to solve this which don't involve editing the file. –  Mick May 16 '14 at 3:07
    
This is the better answer for me, since I don't need to supress CA2213. Upvote. Thanks Scott. –  Biscuits Apr 17 at 11:14

I think you must not care about disposing your class except if you have unmanaged resources. Here is an example where it actually useful:

public class ComplexResourceHolder : IDisposable
{

    private IntPtr buffer; // unmanaged memory buffer
    private SafeHandle resource; // disposable handle to a resource

    public IntPtr Buffer { get { return buffer; } set { buffer = value; } }

    public ComplexResourceHolder()
    {
        this.buffer = ... // allocates memory
        this.resource = ... // allocates the resource
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        ReleaseBuffer(buffer); // release unmanaged memory
    if (disposing)
    { 
        // release other disposable objects
        if (resource!= null)
           resource.Dispose();
    }
}

~ ComplexResourceHolder(){
    Dispose(false);
}

public void Dispose(){
    Dispose(true);
    GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
}

}

Check the MSDN for better understanding of Dispose(bool) finalizer override. And this link about unmanaged resources will be useful as well because this is the first reason why you should use IDisposable.

You might wonder to use constructions like below if the class inherits IDisposable:

using (ComplexResourceHolder crh = new ComplexResourceHolder())
{
    //Do something with buffer for an instance
    //crh.Buffer =
}

Dispose method will be called automatically after closing tag '}'.

share|improve this answer
    
This is misleading, if a member of a class implements dispose, you should implement dispose on the class, not just when you class directly deals with unmanaged resources. Even with managed resources, classes often implement dispose to ensure timely collection of managed resources that are expensive –  Mick May 16 '14 at 2:59
    
Garbage collector will do all the work as fast as he can. Even if you are calling GC.SuppressFinalize(this) it doesn't mean GC will collect it immediately. It will collect whenever GC thinks he can collect it. I have tested memory changes after using disposing on managed resources and without. The timings almost the same. –  Wallstrider May 16 '14 at 12:45
    
Most of .NET classes don't implement IDisposable. Why? Because it unnecessary. –  Wallstrider May 16 '14 at 12:59
    
All Controls from System.Windows.Forms implement IDisposable. That's why all forms contain Dispose method. –  Wallstrider May 16 '14 at 13:12
    
Well we're programming in parallel universes. If I see an object being instantiated that implements IDispose and the owning object never calls Dispose on that object, or it's not wrapped in a using statement, that's a bug in my books. I'll go even further and mention that the GC needs help to garbage collect, especially on platforms like windows phone and windows CE. Implementing Dispose and decoupling objects (setting variables to null) does make a difference. Circular dependencies can create blocks of classes that never get collected. –  Mick May 19 '14 at 1:48

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