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Please find the following codes:

@RunWith(JUnit4.class)
public class TestTimestamp {

    private final static SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyyMMdd HH:mm:ss.SSSSSS");
    private final static SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyyMMdd HH:mm:ss");

    @Test
    public void test() throws ParseException {
        getTimestamp("20140512 16:13:09.493166 +0800", sdf);
        getTimestamp("20140515 15:04:42.690873 +0800", sdf);
        getTimestamp("20140515 15:04:45.159977 +0800", sdf);

        getTimestamp("20140512 16:13:09.493166 +0800", df);
        getTimestamp("20140515 15:04:42.690873 +0800", df);
        getTimestamp("20140515 15:04:45.159977 +0800", df);
    }

    private void getTimestamp(String time, SimpleDateFormat sdf) throws ParseException {
        System.out.println("Time to convert: " + time);
        String[] tmp = time.split("\\+");
        String str = tmp[0].trim();
        System.out.println(str);
        System.out.println(sdf.parse(str));
        System.out.println();
    }

}

The output with sdf is very strange and the output with df is correct:

//Wrong result with sdf
Time to convert: 20140512 16:13:09.493166 +0800
20140512 16:13:09.493166
Mon May 12 16:21:22 CST 2014

Time to convert: 20140515 15:04:42.690873 +0800
20140515 15:04:42.690873
Thu May 15 15:16:12 CST 2014

Time to convert: 20140515 15:04:45.159977 +0800
20140515 15:04:45.159977
Thu May 15 15:07:24 CST 2014


//Correct result with df
Time to convert: 20140512 16:13:09.493166 +0800
20140512 16:13:09.493166
Mon May 12 16:13:09 CST 2014

Time to convert: 20140515 15:04:42.690873 +0800
20140515 15:04:42.690873
Thu May 15 15:04:42 CST 2014

Time to convert: 20140515 15:04:45.159977 +0800
20140515 15:04:45.159977
Thu May 15 15:04:45 CST 2014

Could you please help me out?

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What is your question? –  Code-Apprentice May 16 '14 at 3:13
1  
If you don't need the millisecond precision you could update your split to limit 3 digits beyond the decimal? String[] tmp = time.split("\\d{3}\\s\\+"); –  Jeff Ward May 16 '14 at 3:20
    

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

a millisecond would be SSS being a thousandth. The 159977 length would exceed this being a microsecond

try

yyyyMMdd HH:mm:ss.SSS

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Yeah, I think what it has done is duly converted your 6-digit numbers as milliseconds, which rolled over into seconds, mins, etc. I don't see a format number for nanoseconds on the version of the SimpleDateFormat javadoc I'm looking at... –  arcy May 16 '14 at 3:04
    
That's correct. SimpleDateFormat only works with a Date, which has milliseconds only, no microseconds or nanoseconds. You may have to write your own DateFormat implementation if you want to show or parse microseconds. –  David Wallace May 16 '14 at 3:06
    
Correction: 6 digits is microsecond. A nanosecond is 9 digits, millisecond is 3. –  Basil Bourque May 16 '14 at 6:28
    
@BasilBourque cheers, correction made, I always get confused whether I have a million or a billion in my bank –  Scary Wombat May 16 '14 at 6:29

Both a java.util.Date and Joda-Time have millisecond precision. So they can handle only three digits of a fraction. Either truncate the last three digits of the fraction, or use the new java.time package in Java 8 which can handle nanosecond precision (9 digits).

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