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I imported a CSV file (containing both text columns and number columns) with

x <- fread('myfile.csv', header = TRUE, verbose =T, na.strings = c("null", "'null'", ""))

yet after import all columns are seen as characters when I run summary(x)

mycolumn
Length:100000      
Class :character   
Mode  :character   

Is there any way to make it recognize numerical columns as numbers? The verbose output is below (from a run with nrows), to make it faster.

Input contains no \n. Taking this to be a filename to open
File opened, filesize is 10.162 GB
File is opened and mapped ok
Detected eol as \n only (no \r afterwards), the UNIX and Mac standard.
Looking for supplied sep '\t' on line 30 (the last non blank line in the first 'autostart') ... found ok
Found 166 columns
First row with 166 fields occurs on line 1 (either column names or first row of data)
'header' changed by user from 'auto' to TRUE
Count of eol after first data row: 6513865
Subtracted 1 for last eol and any trailing empty lines, leaving 6513864 data rows
nrow limited to nrows passed in (100000)
Type codes: 4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444441444444444444444444444444444444444444444414444444444444444444444444444444444 (first 5 rows)
Type codes: 4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444441444444444444444444444444444444444444444414444444444444444444444444444444444 (+middle 5 rows)
Type codes: 4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444441444444444444444444444444444444444444444414444444444444444444444444444444444 (+last 5 rows)
Type codes: 4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444441444444444444444444444444444444444444444414444444444444444444444444444444444 (after applying colClasses and integer64)
Type codes: 4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444441444444444444444444444444444444444444444414444444444444444444444444444444444 (after applying drop or select (if supplied)
Allocating 166 column slots (166 - 0 NULL)
Read 100000 rows and 166 (of 166) columns from 10.162 GB file in 00:00:04
   0.564s ( 15%) Memory map (rerun may be quicker)
   0.001s (  0%) sep and header detection
   1.613s ( 43%) Count rows (wc -l)
   0.030s (  1%) Column type detection (first, middle and last 5 rows)
   0.015s (  0%) Allocation of 100000x166 result (xMB) in RAM
   1.437s ( 38%) Reading data
   0.000s (  0%) Allocation for type bumps (if any), including gc time if triggered
   0.000s (  0%) Coercing data already read in type bumps (if any)
   0.080s (  2%) Changing na.strings to NA
   3.739s        Total
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The way to manually specify classes for columns is via the colClasses argument. But freads should be able to automatically guess the numeric columns, which makes me think that there are entries in your numeric columns that are not numeric. Perhaps you haven't managed to catch all types of NA values? –  Mattrition May 16 at 12:46
    
I'll double check; nulls are represented as the string null but I captured that already in the command. It's a bit suspect that all columns have been interpreted as character, some values come frmo mandatory fields (including primary keys) so they are clean. I'll try with a subset. –  wishihadabettername May 16 at 15:46
    
@Mattrition You were right, if you put your comment as the answer I'll accept it. –  wishihadabettername May 19 at 0:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The way to manually specify classes for columns is via the colClasses argument. But freads should be able to automatically guess the numeric columns, which makes me think that there are entries in your numeric columns that are not numeric.

Perhaps you haven't managed to catch all types of NA values? If this is the case, the uncaught NA values will be read as character strings, which will cause the whole column to be set as type character.

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