Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What am I doing wrong here?

I am wanting to display integers from 1-100 who are divisible by either 6 or 7. That's done and working. The next step is to not display any that are divisible by both...that isn't working in my loop (those integers are still displaying)

for (int i = 1; i < 100; i++)
    if (i % 6 == 0 || i % 7 == 0 && i % (6 * 7) != 0){
        println(i);
    }

Thanks! Joel

share|improve this question
    
Java Operator Precedence: java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/… –  Josh Lee Mar 3 '10 at 7:43
    
Cool. Thanks! I was mistakenly separating the three arguments in my head and not thinking parenthesis were needed... –  Joel Mar 3 '10 at 7:47
    
you are not the same Joel as http://www.joelonsoftware.com/, right –  Rakesh Juyal Mar 3 '10 at 7:53
    
@Rakesh: that Joel is: stackoverflow.com/users/4/joel-spolsky. Somehow I doubt he'd get confused over precedence. –  outis Mar 3 '10 at 8:53
    
Indeed we are different people... –  Joel Mar 3 '10 at 22:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

try making your condition more explicit by adding (...), like so:


if (((i % 6 == 0 || i % 7 == 0) && (i % (6 * 7) != 0)) {
}

by default && takes precedence over ||

share|improve this answer
1  
in general, dont ever assume anything about order of evaluation or "stickiness" of logical operators, always add (...) –  radai Mar 3 '10 at 7:41
    
great. Thanks guys! –  Joel Mar 3 '10 at 7:44

Missing parentheses:

for (int i = 1; i < 100; i++) {
    if ((i % 6 == 0 || i % 7 == 0) && i % (6 * 7) != 0) {
        println(i);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks-that did it! –  Joel Mar 3 '10 at 7:45

You could also use the exclusive or

    for (int i = 1; i < 100; i++) {
        if ((i % 6 == 0) ^ (i % 7 == 0)) {
            println(i);
        }
    }

or just an unequal if ((i % 6 == 0) != (i % 7 == 0))
Since exclusive or is not used that often, I doubt this will increase the readability of the code...

share|improve this answer

I would simply stop worrying about how to evaluate precedence, and use something like:

for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++) {
    if ((i % 42) == 0) continue;
    if ((i %  6) == 0) println (i);
    if ((i %  7) == 0) println (i);
}

I'm assuming here that 1-100 was an inclusive range in which case you should use <= rather than <. It won't matter for your specific case since 100 is divisible by neither 6 nor 7.

Guess what? Any decent optimising compiler (including JIT ones) will probably end up generating the same code as for all the other possibilities. And, even if it didn't, it wouldn't matter unless you were calling this function a great many times.

I think that's a tiny bit more readable than:

if (i % 6 == 0 || i % 7 == 0 && i % (6 * 7) != 0) ...

or, worse yet, the Lisp-like thing you'll have to turn it into to get it working properly :-)


Keep in mind one possibility - you can change your loop to make it more efficient (sevenfold), for the specific case with 6 and 7, thus:

for (int i = 7; i <= 100; i += 7)
    if ((i % 6) != 0)
        println (i);

This uses the for loop itself to only check multiples of 7 and print them if they're not also multiples of 6.

share|improve this answer
for (int i = 1; i < 100; i++)
if ((i % 6 == 0 || i % 7 == 0) && !(i % 6 == 0 && i % 7 == 0)){
    println(i);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This does NOT compile! Wrong position of the closing parenthesis here (i % 6 == 0 || i % 7) == 0 should be (i % 6 == 0 || i % 7 == 0) –  Carlos Heuberger Mar 3 '10 at 8:34
    
oops, thanks for that –  objects Mar 3 '10 at 8:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.