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I have a class:

class Test
{
    public $AppCount;
    public $Apps;

    // When $AppCount is accessed I want to return count( $this->Apps )
}

When I access property $AppCount, I want to return count( $this->Apps ).

Rather than having to declare an exposing function for this property and making it private, can I use a getter function like C# and Java have?

Obviously the __get is not what i want in this case as the property does already exist.

For the comments

I have this and it does not run the function when i try and access the property:

class ProjectSettingsViewModel
{
    public $ProjectAppCount = 0;
    public $ProjectApps = array();

    public function __get( $property )
    {
        switch( $property )
        {
            case "ProjectAppCount":
                return count( $this->ProjectApps );
                break;
        }
    }
}

If the code seems okay, it must be something else going wrong.

share|improve this question
    
You can use __get with properties that exist – John Conde May 16 '14 at 13:12
    
You can use the magic __get method for this, but please just create a Test::getCount() method. It's called make for a reason – PeeHaa May 16 '14 at 13:13
3  
1) It works if you make it private / protected. 2) That property is useless if you calculate it any way 3) But again. Staph using magic in your code. – PeeHaa May 16 '14 at 13:18
1  
I posted answer, but I second @PeeHaa .. Using magic in your code dangerous. – Zander Rootman May 16 '14 at 13:19
1  
Yep.. Like I said. He is correct. Credits to @PeeHaa – Zander Rootman May 16 '14 at 13:24
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Untested.. Should work though. Using more magic methodology.

class ProjectSettingsViewModel
{
    protected $ProjectAppCount = 0;
    public $ProjectApps = array();

    public function __get( $property )
    {
        switch( $property )
        {
            case "ProjectAppCount":
                return count( $this->ProjectApps );
                break;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Ugh is this really how PHP handles properties? – Lightness Races in Orbit May 16 '14 at 13:56
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit No. This is how some developers handle properties. It's not really recommended, as I explain in my answer. – Nic May 16 '14 at 14:05
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit like the comments on the question explains, magic is bad practice. However, PHP does allow you to do some pretty stupid things. – Zander Rootman May 16 '14 at 14:09
    
@ZanderRootman: Like using it. :) – Lightness Races in Orbit May 16 '14 at 14:45
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit hahaha, touche. – Zander Rootman May 17 '14 at 22:17

Unfortunately, PHP does not have the getter and setter syntax you are referring to. It has been proposed, but it didn't make it into PHP (yet).

First of all, __get() is only executed if you are trying to access a property that can't be accessed (because it is protected or private, or because it does not exist). If you are calling a property that is public, __get() will never be executed.

However, I would not suggest using PHP's magic getters and setters unless you really have no other choice. They are slower, tend to become a long if/elseif/else mess very quickly, and code completion (using a smart IDE) will not work. Normal methods are a lot simpler and easier to understand. You should also read this answer.

I have used the __get() and __set() methods for a while (instead of manually created getFoo() and setFoo() methods), because it seemed like a good idea, but I've changed my mind after a short time.

So, in your case, I recommend writing normal methods:

<?php

class Test
{
    /**
     * @var App[]
     */
    private $apps;

    /**
     * Returns an array containing all apps
     *
     * @return App[]
     */
    public function getApps()
    {
        return $this->apps;
    }

    /**
     * Returns the number of apps
     *
     * @return integer
     */
    public function getAppsCount() //or call it countApps()
    {
        return count($this->apps);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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