Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to do the following but I think I must be missing something...(fairly new to generics)

(Need to target .NET 2.0 BTW)

interface IHasKey
{
    string LookupKey { get; set; }
}
...

public static Dictionary<string, T> ConvertToDictionary(IList<T> myList) where T : IHasKey
{
    Dictionary<string, T> dict = new Dictionary<string, T>();
    foreach(T item in myList)
    {
        dict.Add(item.LookupKey, item);
    }

    return dict;
}

Unfortunately, this gives a "Constraints are not allowed on non-generic declarations" error. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
2  
What's your problem exactly? –  Paolo Tedesco Mar 3 '10 at 8:50
    
Sorry, I've put the compiler error message under the post now. –  Damien Mar 3 '10 at 8:55
    
The items you are adding, are they of the same class, or different classes which implement IHasKey? –  Mikael Svenson Mar 3 '10 at 9:09
    
@Mikael - Yes, the classes are all different. –  Damien Mar 3 '10 at 9:13
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have not declared the generic parameter.
Change your declaration to:

public static Dictionary<string, T> ConvertToDictionary<T> (IList<T> myList) where T : IHasKey{
}
share|improve this answer
    
What's the point of using "T where IHasKey" instead of declaring it Dictionary<string,IHasKey> in this scenario? –  Mikael Svenson Mar 3 '10 at 8:59
2  
@Mikael: in this way the return value is a Dictionary<string, Something> instead of a Dictionary<string, IHasKey>, so when you access the value you avoid an extra cast and are sure which objects your dictionary contains. –  Paolo Tedesco Mar 3 '10 at 9:04
    
Good point! But if you were to think along the lines that the input list might contain different implementations of IHasKey, then boxing is unavoidable. –  Mikael Svenson Mar 3 '10 at 9:12
1  
@Mikael: ok, but note that you could still use the same method with T=IHasKey. In any case I see no disadvantage in the generic approach. –  Paolo Tedesco Mar 3 '10 at 9:30
    
I agree :) So it moves over to a philosophical question: Should you define it generically, when you know you will instantiate it with an interface and not a concrete type? –  Mikael Svenson Mar 3 '10 at 9:44
add comment

Try something like this

public class MyObject : IHasKey
{
    public string LookupKey { get; set; }
}

public interface IHasKey
{
    string LookupKey { get; set; }
} 


public static Dictionary<string, T> ConvertToDictionary<T>(IList<T> myList) where T: IHasKey 
{ 
    Dictionary<string, T> dict = new Dictionary<string, T>(); 
    foreach(T item in myList) 
    { 
        dict.Add(item.LookupKey, item); 
    } 
    return dict; 
}

List<MyObject> list = new List<MyObject>();
MyObject o = new MyObject();
o.LookupKey = "TADA";
list.Add(o);
Dictionary<string, MyObject> dict = ConvertToDictionary(list);

You forgot the Generic Paramter in the method

public static Dictionary<string, T> ConvertToDictionary<T>(IList<T> myList) where T: IHasKey
share|improve this answer
add comment

Since the classes in the input list are different (as you say in your comment) you can either implement it like suggested by @orsogufo, or you could just as well implement your signature on the interface itself:

public static Dictionary<string, IHasKey> ConvertToDictionary(IList<IHasKey> myList) 
{
    var dict = new Dictionary<string, IHasKey>();
    foreach (IHasKey item in myList)
    {
        dict.Add(item.LookUpKey, item);
    }
    return dict;
}

Using the generic declaration is best if you have a list of one specific implementation of the interface as noted in the comments to the other answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but as orsogufo pointed out, this requires casting of IHasKey objects to access other members after retrieval from the dictionary. –  Damien Mar 3 '10 at 9:40
    
But if the input list is of type IList<IHasKey> which I assume it is since you have different classes in it, it makes no difference which implementation you use, since you would get an extra boxing for both if you wanted to do something with a specific class. –  Mikael Svenson Mar 3 '10 at 9:43
    
The input list isn't necessarily IList<IHasKey> but if it were you'd be right –  Damien Mar 3 '10 at 10:27
    
@Mikael, the input list could be a IList<Customer> where Customer : IHasKey. In that case, we get back a Dictionary<string, Customer> instead of a Dictionary<string, IHasKey>. The Customer valued Dictionary is more useful (avoids needless casting). –  David B Mar 3 '10 at 18:23
    
@David B: In scenarios where the List has one class type I agree 100%, but @Damien said in a comment that the list could contain several implementations of IHasKey (the way I understood it), and in that case it has to be a IList<IHasKey>. Just wanted to get the actual scenario @Damien wanted to cover. –  Mikael Svenson Mar 4 '10 at 7:21
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.