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Returning a method value from inside a using statement that gets a DataContext seems to always work fine, like this:

public static Transaction GetMostRecentTransaction(int singleId)
{
    using (var db = new DataClasses1DataContext())
    {
        var transaction = (from t in db.Transactions
                              orderby t.WhenCreated descending
                              where t.Id == singleId
                              select t).SingleOrDefault();
        return transaction;
    }
}

But I always feel like I should be closing something before I break out of the using brackets, e.g. by defining transaction before the using statement, get it's value inside the brackets, and then returning after the brackets.

Would defining and returning the variable outside the using brackets be better practice or conserve resources in any way?

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1  
It might be interesting to look at the general IL for variants of this. I suspect that there would be little difference in the generated IL. I normally wouldnt even bother declaring the var transaction - just return the result of the expression. –  Jonesie Mar 3 '10 at 9:09
3  
@Manish, no why would it be? –  Filip Ekberg Mar 3 '10 at 9:20

4 Answers 4

No, I think it's clearer this way. Don't worry, Dispose will still be called "on the way out" - and only after the return value is fully evaluated. If an exception is thrown at any point (including evaluating the return value) Dispose will still be called too.

While you certainly could take the longer route, it's two extra lines that just add cruft and extra context to keep track of (mentally). In fact, you don't really need the extra local variable - although it can be handy in terms of debugging. You could just have:

public static Transaction GetMostRecentTransaction(int singleId)
{
    using (var db = new DataClasses1DataContext())
    {
        return (from t in db.Transactions
                orderby t.WhenCreated descending
                where t.Id == singleId
                select t).SingleOrDefault();
    }
}

Indeed, I might even be tempted to use dot notation, and put the Where condition within the SingleOrDefault:

public static Transaction GetMostRecentTransaction(int singleId)
{
    using (var db = new DataClasses1DataContext())
    {
        return db.Transactions.OrderByDescending(t => t.WhenCreated)
                              .SingleOrDefault(t => t.Id == singleId);
    }
}
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Sine it's you @jon, is it still safe if an exception gets thrown inside the using block? –  Dave Archer Mar 3 '10 at 9:08
1  
yes. using is simply syntactic sugar for a try/finally construct –  Mitch Wheat Mar 3 '10 at 9:09
    
@Mitch, thanks :-) –  Dave Archer Mar 3 '10 at 9:11
1  
Why use OrderByDescending in combination with SingleOrDefault? –  erikkallen Mar 4 '10 at 13:18
1  
@erikkallen: LINQ doesn't have a "MaxBy", unfortunately - so you can't get the row with the maximal value. For LINQ to Objects you can write your own fairly easily, but I'm not sure of a better way of doing it in this case. What would you suggest instead? –  Jon Skeet Mar 4 '10 at 13:51

Have a look at this

Understanding the 'using' statement in C#

The CLR converts your code into MSIL. And the using statement gets translated into a try and finally block. This is how the using statement is represented in IL. A using statement is translated into three parts: acquisition, usage, and disposal. The resource is first acquired, then the usage is enclosed in a try statement with a finally clause. The object then gets disposed in the finally clause.

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2  
An interesting insight. Thanks. –  Kangkan Mar 3 '10 at 9:12
1  
That translates the question to: Any side effects of returning from the try-block of a try-finally? –  Henk Holterman Mar 3 '10 at 10:55
2  
No, the finally will always be called. techinterviews.com/interview-questions-for-c-developers –  Adriaan Stander Mar 3 '10 at 11:02

There are no side effects of returning from inside a using() statement.

Whether it makes the most readable code is another discussion.

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I think, it's all the same. There's nothing bad in the code. The .NET framework wouldn't care where the object is created. The thing that matters is whether it is referenced or not.

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