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I am new bie to java unable to check for null.

can you enlighten me on this.

I have int array which has no elements

I tried this code

int[] k = new int[3];

if(k==null)
{
    System.out.println(k.length);
}

but this condition always stay false and nerver prints "k.length"

share|improve this question
    
Could you post a bit more of the code please? The bit where the array is initialised would be useful to see. –  Scobal Mar 3 '10 at 9:23
    
I am not sure what your asking. Surelly to check if an array is null one would say (array == null) –  Paul Mar 3 '10 at 9:34
5  
Do you not want if (k != null) –  vickirk Mar 3 '10 at 10:51

6 Answers 6

up vote 74 down vote accepted

There's a key difference between a null array and an empty array. This is a test for null.

int arr[] = null;
if (arr == null) {
  System.out.println("array is null");
}

"Empty" here has no official meaning. I'm choosing to define empty as having 0 elements:

arr = new int[0];
if (arr.length == 0) {
  System.out.println("array is empty");
}

An alternative definition of "empty" is if all the elements are null:

Object arr[] = new Object[10];
boolean empty = true;
for (int i=0; i<arr.length; i++) {
  if (arr[i] != null) {
    empty = false;
    break;
  }
}

or

Object arr[] = new Object[10];
boolean empty = true;
for (Object ob : arr) {
  if (ob != null) {
    empty = false;
    break;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, couldn't be said better –  medopal Mar 3 '10 at 9:58
    
ups, the last snippet has obj !- null, probably meant to be obj != null –  Carlos Heuberger Mar 3 '10 at 9:58
1  
Don't forget about: org.apache.commons.lang3.ArrayUtils.isEmpty(k) –  aholub7x Sep 21 '12 at 13:29

Look at its length:

int[] i = ...;
if (i.length == 0) { } // no elements in the array

Though it's safer to check for null at the same time:

if (i == null || i.length == 0) { }
share|improve this answer
    
I used this one also. I think it is good coding practice –  exiter2000 Mar 4 '10 at 18:05

An int array without elements is not necessarily null. It will only be null if it hasn't been allocated yet. See this tutorial for more information about Java arrays.

You can test the array's length:

void foo(int[] data)
{
  if(data.length == 0)
    return;
}
share|improve this answer

An int array is initialised with zero so it won't actually ever contain nulls. Only arrays of Object's will contain null initially.

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what if I have to check null for integer –  Ankit Sachan Mar 3 '10 at 9:30
    
You can't check for null with primitives such as int. –  objects Mar 3 '10 at 9:35
2  
depends where you declared it, if as a class member, then yes it's get initialized with zeroes. but when declared locally inside a method, i believe it's another case... you have to assign an initial value yourself. i suppose. just a thought! –  ultrajohn Mar 3 '10 at 9:43

I am from .net background. However, java/c# are more/less same.

If you instantiate a non-primitive type (array in your case), it won't be null.
e.g. int[] numbers = new int[3];
In this case, the space is allocated & each of the element has a default value of 0.

It will be null, when you don't new it up.
e.g.

int[] numbers = null; // changed as per @Joachim's suggestion.
if (numbers == null)
{
   System.out.println("yes, it is null. Please new it up");
}
share|improve this answer
1  
In Java that won't compile, because it will tell you that numbers has not been initialized yet. "Uninitialized" and null are not the same thing. –  Joachim Sauer Mar 3 '10 at 9:30
    
Thanks Joachim. I will edit the post to have int[] numbers changed to int[] numbers == null; In c#, it is not the case. –  shahkalpesh Mar 3 '10 at 10:17

I believe that what you want is

int[] k = new int[3];

if (k != null) {  // Note, != and not == as above
    System.out.println(k.length);
}

You newed it up so it was never going to be null.

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