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Working in RStudio, I am using knitr to create pdf files with chunks of code. In the following example, notice how in the output, spacing after the ## characters is different across the three vectors:

knitr pdf output

This looks pretty neat, but I am writing a document with examples having only one line of output and I'd like to have all the [1]'s properly in line with one another.

In the example, that would mean removing an extra space after the ##'s for the second vector. I am only starting to work with knitr and latex, so I'm not sure how I would achieve such a thing. Some sort of post-processing of the .tex? Or maybe something simpler?

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3 Answers 3

This is not a knitr problem but arises from R's printing:

> 1:5
[1] 1 2 3 4 5
> 1:10
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
> 1:100
  [1]   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18
 [19]  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36
 [37]  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54
 [55]  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72
 [73]  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90
 [91]  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99 100

Post processing would stop your output looking like it would from R.

I'd work on getting that fixed in base R (if it is really a bug and not intended) rather than try to special case this. An RDevel email with the above example (confirmed in a recent R - the above was with 3.0.x-patched) would help you clarify (if) you need a work around.

To focus attention, consider (From @Dominic Comtois' comment)

> 20:28
[1] 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
> 20:29
 [1] 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

why does adding a tenth element change the way R prints the vector?

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1  
It looks like it's intended in order for the right brackets to be aligned (3rd example), but for the discrepancy between the 1st and 2nd one, looks more like a bug. I first thought it had to do with the number of characters in the highest number as @gagolews suggests, but then tried 20:28 vs 20:29 and the same happens. Seems like having 10 items triggers a different output behavior. I'll try the RDevel way. –  Dominic Comtois May 16 '14 at 20:12
    
@DominicComtois Right, I would expect the same alignment for a vector printed within the output width of the console. You example of 20:28 and 20:29 is a better example as there shouldn't, to my eyes, be any reason to move the vector index in by a space here. I'll add that as an illustrative example. –  Gavin Simpson May 16 '14 at 20:17
    
It makes sense! What matters is the length of the vector... –  gagolews May 16 '14 at 20:43
    
Right. R's logic is that if an additional line of output is needed, then the closing brackets are going to be aligned. So I'm left with the post-processing option, as @gagolews' solution leads to other problems unfortunately (a little too long to explain here!). –  Dominic Comtois May 16 '14 at 21:21
    
@gagolews What makes sense? Nothing about why R prints 20:28 and 20:29 makes sense to me if my console has an 80 char width. –  Gavin Simpson May 16 '14 at 21:24

This may not necessarily be an ideal solution, but I hope it will vaguely suit your needs after some tweaks.

I've defined an "adjusted" print function:

print_adj <- function(x, adjpos=6, width=3) {

   # capture output
   con <- textConnection("text", open="w")
   sink(con)
   print(format(x, width=width), quote=FALSE)
   sink()
   close(con)

   library(stringr)
   pos <- str_locate(text, fixed("]"))
   for (i in seq_along(text))
      text[i] <- str_c(str_dup(" ", adjpos-pos[i,1]), text[i])
   cat(text, sep="\n")
}

It prints a vector x in such a way that:

  • the square bracket ] always occurs in the given text column
  • each element occupies exactly width text columns

Sample output:

> print_adj(1:5)
   [1]   1   2   3   4   5
> print_adj(1:10)
   [1]   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10
> print_adj(1:100)
   [1]   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28
  [29]  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56
  [57]  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84
  [85]  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99 100

If you'd like to use this function in a knitr chunk, try:

<<eval=2,echo=1>>=
print(1:100)      # don't eval
print_adj(1:100)  # don't print this cmd
@
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Thanks for this interesting workaround. Only thing is that I'd need it to override the default print method; explicitly calling the function every time I need an output is not really an option. No idea if one can override the default print method. –  Dominic Comtois May 16 '14 at 20:54
    
@DominicComtois: edit made. –  gagolews May 16 '14 at 21:00
1  
Rather than handle this via a print function, you could look at the output hooks used by knitr and modify those to remove the extra space. You could make use of the code shown here to actually facilitate this but in a hook function rather than a print function. –  Gavin Simpson May 16 '14 at 21:25
    
@GavinSimpson I'll look into hook functions, that might well be it. –  Dominic Comtois May 16 '14 at 22:10
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I was able to solve my problem by defining a hook, as Gavin Simpson suggested.

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}

<<setup, include=FALSE>>=
require(stringr)
hook.out <- function(x, options) 
  return(str_c("\\begin{verbatim}",
               sub("\\s+\\[1\\]\\s+"," [1] ",x),
               "\\end{verbatim}"))
knit_hooks$set(output=hook.out)
@

<<>>=
1:9
1:10
@

\end{document}

Output now looks like this:

results after hook is applied

My only remaining concern is that for longer vectors, I will need to bypass the hook and I don't know how to do that.

Credits also go to Rod Alence for his example on this page.

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