Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am coming from c# where this was easy, and possible.

I have this code:

public abstract class clsAbstractTable {

    public abstract String TAG;
    public abstract void init();

}

but Eclipse tells me I use illegal modifier.

I have this class:

public class clsContactGroups extends clsAbstractTable {


}

I want the variable and method defined in such way, that Eclipse to prompt me, I have unimplemented abstract variables and methods.

How do I need to define my abstract class so I should be prompted to implement the abstracts?

EDIT 1

I will create different classes for different db tables. Each class should have it's own TABLENAME variable, no exception. I have to make sure this variable is static each time when I create a new class that extends the abstract class.

Then in the abstract class I will have a method eg: init();

If in this init() method I call TABLENAME, it should take the value from the sub-class.

something like this should also work out

String tablename=(clsAbstract)objItem.TABLENAME;
// where objItem can be any class that extended clsAbstract;

EDIT 2

I want a constant(static) defined in each class having it's name defined in abstract.

  • I define variable TABLENAME in abstract, but no value given.
  • I create a clsContactGroups, I should be prompted to implement TABLENAME, this is where gets some data. eg: TABLENAME="contactgroups";
  • I create a second class clsContacts, I should be prompted to implement TABLENAME, this is where gets some data. eg: TABLENAME="contacts";
    etc...
share|improve this question
    
Abstract variables??? –  user159088 Mar 3 '10 at 12:12
2  
No such thing as abstract variables in Java. Abstract methods, yes. –  duffymo Mar 3 '10 at 12:12
    
the TAG variable in my example. I want to be prompted to implement them on the other classes. –  Pentium10 Mar 3 '10 at 12:12
1  
I don't see any reason why this can't be done using method like getTableName() which is declared as abstract. –  Padmarag Mar 3 '10 at 12:25
2  
Sorry, but that's not possible in C# either. Only instance methods (and setters/getters) can be abstract. –  Markus Johnsson Mar 3 '10 at 13:07
show 5 more comments

10 Answers 10

up vote 25 down vote accepted

I think your confusion is with C# properties vs. fields/variables. In C# you cannot define abstract fields, even in an abstract class. You can, however, define abstract properties as these are effectively methods (e.g. compiled to get_TAG() and set_TAG(...)).

As some have reminded, you should never have public fields/variables in your classes, even in C#. Several answers have hinted at what I would recommend, but have not made it clear. You should translate your idea into Java as a JavaBean property, using getTAG(). Then your sub-classes will have to implement this (I also have written a project with table classes that do this).

So you can have an abstract class defined like this...

public abstract class AbstractTable {

    public abstract String getTag();
    public abstract void init();

    ...
}

Then, in any concrete subclasses you would need to define a static final variable (constant) and return that from the getTag(), something like this:

public class SalesTable extends AbstractTable {

    private static final String TABLE_NAME = "Sales";

    public String getTag() {
        return TABLE_NAME;
    }

    public void init() {
        ...
        String tableName = getTag();
        ...
    }

}

EDIT:

You cannot override inherited fields (in either C# or Java). Nor can you override static members, whether they are fields or methods. So this also is the best solution for that. I changed my init method example above to show how this would be used - again, think of the getXXX method as a property.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 I think this really answers the OP's question, as the original premise of the question is wrong (that C# can have abstract fields) –  JonoW Mar 3 '10 at 13:04
add comment

Define a constructor in the abstract class which sets the field so that the concrete implementations are per the specification required to call/override the constructor.

E.g.

public abstract class AbstractTable {
    protected String name;

    public AbstractTable(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

When you extend AbstractTable, the class won't compile until you add a constructor which calls super("somename").

public class ConcreteTable extends AbstractTable {
    private static final String NAME = "concreteTable";

    public ConcreteTable() {
        super(NAME);
    }
}

This way the implementors are required to set name. This way you can also do (null)checks in the constructor of the abstract class to make it more robust. E.g:

public AbstractTable(String name) {
    if (name == null) throw new NullPointerException("Name may not be null");
    this.name = name;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Beat me to it :) –  seanhodges Mar 3 '10 at 12:16
    
I need this to be done with Static variables. As the variable will be static to the implemented class, like a tablename of the class. I do not want to pass the tablename to the constructor each time. –  Pentium10 Mar 3 '10 at 12:28
    
Static variables are shared among all instances of the class. If you set it, then it will be changed/reflected in all instances of the class, regardless of the implementation. Do you really want this? If so, then I really don't see any benefit of making them abstract ... Exactly due to the previous reason (affecting ALL instances). It's also technically impossible because it violates the OO ideology. You either need to learn Java/OO once again or to rethink your approach/design. –  BalusC Mar 3 '10 at 12:33
    
See my edit to the question. I want a constant(tablename) defined in each class, having it's named defined in abstract. –  Pentium10 Mar 3 '10 at 12:36
    
Then my answer still applies. You don't need to make it static. It makes no sense. –  BalusC Mar 3 '10 at 12:36
show 9 more comments

No such thing as abstract variables in Java (or C++).

If the parent class has a variable, and a child class extends the parent, then the child doesn't need to implement the variable. It just needs access to the parent's instance. Either get/set or protected access will do.

"...so I should be prompted to implement the abstracts"? If you extend an abstract class and fail to implement an abstract method the compiler will tell you to either implement it or mark the subclass as abstract. That's all the prompting you'll get.

share|improve this answer
    
I want to make sure that the sub class defines that variable. How can I be sure? –  Pentium10 Mar 3 '10 at 12:15
    
@Pentium10: what advantage would that have over simply defining the variable in the base class in the first place? –  Joachim Sauer Mar 3 '10 at 12:16
    
I will create different classes for different db tables. Each class should have it's own TABLENAME variable, no exception. I have to make sure this variables is static each time when I create a new class that extends the abstract class. –  Pentium10 Mar 3 '10 at 12:18
    
See my edit to the question. –  Pentium10 Mar 3 '10 at 12:29
    
I doubt that you need one class per table. I belive one class with multiple instances created in memory will suffice. –  duffymo Mar 3 '10 at 13:01
add comment

The best you could do is have accessor/mutators for the variable.
Something like getTAG()
That way all implementing classes would have to implement them.

Abstract classes are used to define abstract behaviour not data.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I want to define abstract behavior, I mean to define the name, then I will deal with the data at the implementation level. –  Pentium10 Mar 3 '10 at 12:56
add comment

As there is no implementation of a variable it can't be abstract ;)

share|improve this answer
add comment

No, Java doesn't support abstract variables. It doesn't really make a lot of sense, either.

What specific change to the "implementation" of a variable to you expect a sub class to do?

When I have a abstract String variable in the base class, what should the sub class do to make it non-abstract?

share|improve this answer
    
I want to make sure that the sub class defines that variable. –  Pentium10 Mar 3 '10 at 12:14
    
@Pentium10: you already said that, but why? What good would it do? Why not define it in the base class? –  Joachim Sauer Mar 3 '10 at 12:17
    
I want to give value in the sub-class. –  Pentium10 Mar 3 '10 at 12:59
    
because the subclasses may have different values but he wants to ensure that each one has a value? –  lathomas64 Aug 1 '11 at 17:16
add comment

Just add this method to the base class

public abstract class clsAbstractTable {

    public abstract String getTAG();
    public abstract void init();

}

Now every class that extends the base class (and does not want to be abstract) should provide a TAG

You could also go with BalusC's answer

share|improve this answer
    
That's not a solution. The solution starts with finding out what the OP wants to achieve. –  Joachim Sauer Mar 3 '10 at 12:16
    
I edited my questions, I hope it's clear what I want to achieve. –  Pentium10 Mar 3 '10 at 12:29
    
I think this is the solution. At least the only one that Java provides that meets all of the requirements. Every subclass will have to provide a getTAG implementation that can return a string constant for that subclass. In my opinion, this is even better than keeping it around in a per-instance variable as in the original code. –  PSpeed Mar 3 '10 at 12:36
    
I would discourage putting get/set in interface like this. –  duffymo Mar 3 '10 at 13:02
    
@Joachim: that seems a bit harsh. I think Lombo understood the OP quite well and the getter method really is the better implementation, just not fully worked out here. –  Kevin Brock Mar 3 '10 at 13:12
show 3 more comments

Why do you want all subclasses to define the variable? If every subclass is supposed to have it, just define it in the superclass. BTW, given that it's good OOP practice not to expose fields anyway, your question makes even less sense.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Change the code to:

public abstract class clsAbstractTable {
  protected String TAG;
  public abstract void init();
}

public class clsContactGroups extends clsAbstractTable {
  public String doSomething() {
    return TAG + "<something else>";
  }
}

That way, all of the classes who inherit this class will have this variable. You can do 200 subclasses and still each one of them will have this variable.

Side note: do not use CAPS as variable name; common wisdom is that all caps identifiers refer to constants, i.e. non-changeable pieces of data.

share|improve this answer
    
When I create a new Class, will I be prompted to define the TAG for that class too? –  Pentium10 Mar 3 '10 at 12:30
    
As some have reminded, you should never have public fields/variables in your classes -- There is nothing wrong with public final fields in public final class, just a matter of taste. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Mar 3 '10 at 13:27
    
After reading the OP's second edit, I believe he is looking for OOP mechanisms on class level, which is not supported by Java. You can do all the OOP you want with instance methods, however not with class (static in Java) methods. You will either have to (1) live with the fact that every instance will have its own copy of the variable, or (2) make a global HashMap to contain mappings between class names and the values of TAG on a per-class basis. Both of which are imperfect, but hey, nobody said Java understands English. ;) –  dimitko Mar 3 '10 at 16:19
add comment

To add per-class metadata, maybe an annotation might be the correct way to go.

However, you can't enforce the presence of an annotation in the interface, just as you can't enforce static members or the existence of a specific constructor.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.