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This is the sequential version:

void f(long n) {
   for (int i=1; i<n-1; i++) {
      // do nothing     
   }
}

List result = []
(1..99999).each {
   f(it)
   result << it
}

It takes a few seconds to run the code.

void f(long n) {
   for (int i=1; i<n-1; i++) {
      // do nothing
   }
}

withPool {
   runForkJoin(1,99999) { a, b ->
      List result = []
      (a..b).each {
         f(it)
         result << it
      }
      return result
   }
}

The code above takes several minutes to finish. I haven't call any forkOffChild() or childrenResults() yet. I'm running this code in Windows and single core CPU with Intel Hyperthreading (2 logical CPU). Java Runtime.runtime.availableProcessors() returns 2.

I don't understand why the code that uses runForkJoin much slower than the sequential code (minutes versus seconds).

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The runForJoin() method has no impact on performance in the code snippet. It is the withPool() method, that causes the slowdown. This is because the withPool() method adds several xxxParallel() methods to the Groovy Object's dynamic scope, which then slows down method resolution.

Annotating the f() method as @CompileStatic will give you the expected performance.

share|improve this answer
    
Adding @CompileStatic indeed give me the expected performance. Thanks, it solves my problem. A bit curious about the problem: I doubt it is the method resolution, duplicating the method's content inside withPool closure still result in massive slow down. – David Bower May 18 '14 at 17:24

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