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I need a shell command or script that converts a UNIX timestamp to a date. The input can come either from the first parameter or from stdin, allowing for the following usage patterns:

ts2date 1267619929

and

echo 1267619929 | ts2date

Both commands should output "Wed Mar 3 13:38:49 2010".

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10 Answers 10

up vote 80 down vote accepted

On later versions of common Linux distributions you can use:

date -d @1267619929
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This should be the accepted answer. –  Matt Williamson Mar 4 at 3:13
date -r<number>

works for me on mac osx

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Yes, but it doesn't handle fractions of a second. –  mgold Oct 31 '13 at 22:21

This version is similar to chiborg's answer, but it eliminates the need for the external tty and cat. It uses date, but could just as easily use gawk. You can change the shebang and replace the double square brackets with single ones and this will also run in sh.

#!/bin/bash
LANG=C
if [[ -z "$1" ]]
then
    if [[ -p /dev/stdin ]]    # input from a pipe
    then
        read -r p
    else
        echo "No timestamp given." >&2
        exit
    fi
else
    p=$1
fi
date -d @$p +%c
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+1: very complete answer and I think date is faster than gawk. –  Bruno Brant Mar 3 '10 at 14:19
    
@Bruno, how do you know date is faster than gawk.? –  ghostdog74 Mar 3 '10 at 14:23
3  
@Bruno, @ghostdog74: On my system, gawk is (very roughly) 15% faster than date in a timed for loop consisting only of gawk 'BEGIN { print strftime("%c", 1256571985); }' or date -d '@1256571985' +%c with output redirected to /dev/null. –  Dennis Williamson Mar 3 '10 at 14:57
    
I chose this as the "best" answer because the script satisfies the "date input via parameter or stdin" better. Thanks for enhancing my shellscripting skills! –  chiborg Mar 8 '10 at 21:31
    
date is marginally (5%) faster than gawk for me (mac osx 10.9.2, date 8.23, gawk 4.1.1), but the real advantage of (g)awk is to accept a pipe of a column of many timestamps (see my answer below), which makes the script e.g. 250x as fast for 1000 timestamps. –  Webb Phillips Sep 25 at 23:10

you can use GNU date eg

$ sec=1267619929
$ date -d "UTC 1970-01-01 $sec secs"

or

$ date -ud @1267619929
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You can use this simple awk script:

#!/bin/gawk -f   
{ print strftime("%c", $0); }

Sample usage:

$ echo '1098181096' | ./a.awk 
Tue 19 Oct 2004 03:18:16 AM PDT
$
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This doesn't fit the first usage - sometimes I don't want to echo the TS and use a parameter instead. –  chiborg Mar 3 '10 at 12:52

I have written a script that does this myself:

#!/bin/bash
LANG=C
if [ -z "$1" ]; then
    if [  "$(tty)" = "not a tty" ]; then
            p=`cat`;
    else
            echo "No timestamp given."
            exit
    fi
else
    p=$1
fi
echo $p | gawk '{ print strftime("%c", $0); }'
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Your question tags include "bash", but your shebang says "sh". –  Dennis Williamson Mar 3 '10 at 13:26
    
Thanks, fixed it. –  chiborg Mar 3 '10 at 13:42

I use this when converting log files or monitoring them:

tail -f <log file> | gawk \
'{ printf strftime("%c", $1); for (i=2; i<NF; i++) printf $i " "; print $NF }'
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In this answer I copy Dennis Williamson's answer and modify it slightly to allow a vast speed increase when piping a column of many timestamps to the script. For example, piping 1000 timestamps to the original script with xargs -n1 on my machine took 6.929s as opposed to 0.027s with this modified version:

#!/bin/bash
LANG=C
if [[ -z "$1" ]]
then
    if [[ -p /dev/stdin ]]    # input from a pipe
    then
        cat - | gawk '{ print strftime("%c", $1); }'
    else
        echo "No timestamp given." >&2
        exit
    fi
else
    date -d @$1 +%c
fi
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In PHP

$unix_time = 1256571985;

echo date("Y-m-d H:i:s",$unix_time)
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Nice, but I just wanted to use bash. –  chiborg Mar 3 '10 at 12:53

i found this nifty little script to convert unixtimes in squid access logs. should be able to adapt this. http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5891/convert-squid-unixtime-logs-in-human-readable-ones

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