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I am learning data.table so I'm very new to it's syntax. I am trying to use the package as a hash lookup and it works well except, because of my ignorance of syntax, it reorders the rows. I want it not to reorder the rows without sacrificing speed (i.e., the efficient way to accomplish this). Here is an example and desired output:

library(data.table)

(key <- setNames(aggregate(mpg~as.character(carb), mtcars, mean), c("x", "y")))
set.seed(10)
terms <- data.frame(x = c(9, 12, sample(key[, 1], 6, TRUE)), stringsAsFactors = FALSE)

## > terms$x
## [1] "9"  "12" "4"  "2"  "3"  "6"  "1"  "2"

setDT(key)
setDT(terms)
setkey(key, x) 
setkey(terms, x)
terms[key, out := i.y]
terms

This gives:

##     x      out
## 1:  1 25.34286
## 2: 12       NA
## 3:  2 22.40000
## 4:  2 22.40000
## 5:  3 16.30000
## 6:  4 15.79000
## 7:  6 19.70000
## 8:  9       NA

I want:

##     x      out
## 1:  9       NA
## 2: 12       NA
## 3:  4 15.79000
## 4:  2 22.40000
## 5:  3 16.30000
## 6:  6 19.70000
## 7:  1 25.34286
## 8:  2 22.40000
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In data.table, a join x[i] has to have a key set for x, but it's not essential for the key to be set for i.

NOTE: But if you don't set the key for i,

  • 1) Ensure that the columns of i are in the same order as the key columns of x (reorder if necessary, using setcolorder), as it doesn't join by checking for names (yet).

  • 2) It could be a tad slower (but not by much in my benchmarks).

The issue therefore is that, if you just want to do a x[i] join without any additional preprocessing, then terms has to take the place of i with no key set in order to get the results in the order you require.

With this in mind, we can approach this in two ways (that I could think of).


First method:

This one requires no additional preprocessing. That is we treat key as x as mentioned above - meaning it's key has to be set. We don't set key for terms.

setkey(key, x)

The first column of terms is also named x and that's the column we want to join with. So, no reordering needed here.

ans = key[terms]
> ans
#     x        y
# 1:  9       NA
# 2: 12       NA
# 3:  4 15.79000
# 4:  2 22.40000
# 5:  3 16.30000
# 6:  6 19.70000
# 7:  1 25.34286
# 8:  2 22.40000

The difference is that this is an entirely new data.table, not just assigning the column by reference.


Second method:

We do a little extra preprocessing - addition of an extra column N to terms, by reference, which runs from 1:nrow(terms). This basically helps us to rearrange the data back in the order required, after the join. Here, we'll consider terms as x.

terms[, N := 1:.N]
setkey(terms, x)

It doesn't matter if key has 'x' column set as key.. But again, ensure that x is the first column in key if it's key isn't set.. In my case, I'll set the key column of key to x.

setkey(key, x)
setkey(terms[key, out := i.y], N)
> terms
#     x N      out
# 1:  9 1       NA
# 2: 12 2       NA
# 3:  4 3 15.79000
# 4:  2 4 22.40000
# 5:  3 5 16.30000
# 6:  6 6 19.70000
# 7:  1 7 25.34286
# 8:  2 8 22.40000

Personally, since you require terms unsorted, I'd go with the first method here. But feel free to benchmark on your real data dimensions and choose which suits your need best.

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I went with the first w/o benching b/c it's simple and was < 1 sec on 10 million terms w/ 26 key values. Thanks for the help. –  Tyler Rinker May 17 at 17:32

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