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I'm reading Effective Java 2nd edition from Joshua Bloch, item 25 (page 122). As you read further into the chapter, you get to a point where the author writes the following code :

// Naive generic version of reduction - won't compile!
static <E> E reduce(List<E> list, Function<E> f, E initVal) {
    E[] snapshot = list.toArray(); // Locks list
    E result = initVal;
    for (E e : snapshot)
    {
        result = f.apply(result, e);
    }
    return result;
}

Then the author states that the compiler won´t compile this because you need to add an explicit cast to the line where is the assignment E[] snapshot = list.toArray();, resulting on this E[] snapshot = (E[]) list.toArray();, and after this you well get a warning saying that there is [unchecked] unchecked cast.


Q1: I know that the book was taking into account changes up to Java 6 (and we are at Java almost 8 right now). However, I wrote the same method, a get the same error from the compile. This is because I am required to add the explicit cast. There is however no warning. So what is that warning about?


Q2: The author states the following method will work but it turns out that it isn't type safe.

With minor modifications, you could get it to throw a ClassCastException on a line that doesn't contain an explicit cast.

Okay, I understand that... but how can I get it to throw a ClassCastException?


I leave this post with a ready to run example, if you want to check the things for yourselves:

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;

public class Main
{

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        List<Integer> ints = Arrays.asList(10,20,30);
        Integer result = reduce (ints,new Function<Integer>() {

            @Override
            public Integer apply(Integer arg1, Integer arg2)
            {
                return arg1 + arg2;
            }
        },0);
        System.out.println(result);
    }

    static <E> E reduce(List<E> list, Function<E> f, E initVal)
    {
        E[] snapshot = (E[]) list.toArray(); // Locks list
        E result = initVal;
        for (E e : snapshot)
        {
            result = f.apply(result, e);
        }
        return result;
    }

    interface Function<T>
    {
        public T apply(T arg1, T arg2);
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
I get a warning. Might be that you have that particular warning turned off in your IDE? –  user3580294 May 17 at 15:58
1  
@LuiggiMendoza I did read the question. OP said there was no warning. I'm saying that I get one. Question 1 is why that warning was there and/or what it means, and I know I didn't answer that. –  user3580294 May 17 at 16:01
1  
@user3580294 yes, I misread that part of the question. Not sure which compiler OP uses and/or what settings he/she may have. –  Luiggi Mendoza May 17 at 16:10
    
Yes i am compiling within my IDE, and it ignores silently that warning. A compilation from command line, reveals the same that the author of the book states. –  Victor May 17 at 18:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Question one: Why is E[] snapshot = (E[]) list.toArray(); warning about unsafe check?

The reason is that, in java, arrays keep their type information, while generics get erased. At runtime all List<String>, List<Dog> and List<NuclearBomb> are effectively List<Object>.

Therefore:

List<E> list becomes List<Object>

And

E[] array = (E[]) list.toArray();

Is unsafe.

Question two: How can that fail at runtime?

If java lets you do

E[] array = (E[]) list.toArray();

with a list of Objects, it will also let you do:

String[] array = (String[]) list.toArray();

Since strings are objects after all. That line would compile (with a warning) and on runtime you'd get a cast exception.

share|improve this answer
    
ummmmm, sorry my good friend but i didn't catch up. About the first, i understand the type erasure process that happens to remove the type information in order to leave code in java that could operate with legacy code. But why is unsafe? –  Victor May 17 at 18:53
    
Also List<E> after type erasure becomes a raw List i think, or at least Joshua states that. The list doesn't becomes List<Object>, instead the internal parametrized symbols of the List<E> becomes Object, but the List<SomeClass>, as a whole, becomes a List. Please readers, correct me if i am wrong. And please, help me to understand why is unsafe? Thanks! –  Victor May 17 at 19:01
    
i Understand the second answer, but i see no logic on doing that on a code that in first place is about the be generic.... i don't understand Joshua intentions perhaps... also, i would remind that the he states the problem can be raised on a line that "doesn't contain an explicit cast". –  Victor May 17 at 19:04
1  
I just has understand the first and second example. From the first is unsafe, because at compile time the compiler don´t know what type will be E, so the compiler see something like this E<AnyType> = (E<AnyType>) (Object[]), and knowing that AnyType perphaps will not be at runtime exactly Object and therebefore no will be ready for storing values that are not compatible with the actual type parameter applied at runtime, say, al kind of Objects that stays between Object and AnyType in the class hierarchy. –  Victor May 18 at 0:48
    
And for the second, the first leads to the answer suposing that the actual type parameter applied at runtime stands, in the class hierarchy, between the concrete type used to the array named array and do the cast, and the class Object, that, in fact is the type of array that the expression list.toArray() returns. –  Victor May 18 at 0:52
E[] snapshot = list.toArray();

list.toArray() returns Object[] instead of E[]. So you need an explicit cast there. But the presence of the explicit (or dynamic) cast like that means that compiler could not guarantee the type-safety there. Instead your are telling the compiler that everything is fine and it will actually be an E[] at runtime. So, it gives you a warning about it saying - unchecked cast. Note, that if the compiler was able to guarantee the type-safety there, then it would be a static/checked cast (performed implicitly by the compiler itself) there, instead.

share|improve this answer
1  
What happened with the answer for question 2? –  Luiggi Mendoza May 17 at 16:12
1  
It says: Finally, but not least important... –  Luiggi Mendoza May 17 at 16:14
1  
@BheshGurung I believe the minor modification is what OP's second question was about. And "With minor modifications, you could get it to throw a ClassCastException on a line that doesn't contain an explicit cast." –  user3580294 May 17 at 16:40
1  
@BheshGurung That is a minor modification, but not one that fits Bloch's statement. He was talking about a modification that would result in a ClassCastException on a line without an explicit cast. Pretty sure what you got there is an explicit cast. –  user3580294 May 17 at 16:45
1  
Generics is compile type only feature and all the generic info are removed by the type-erasure. When it happens without any bound like that, that E will turn into Object. –  Bhesh Gurung May 17 at 16:57

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