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I am new in the functional side of C#, sorry if the question is lame.

Given the following WRONG code:

var jobSummaries = from job in jobs
                   where ...
                   select new 
                   {
                        ID = job.ID,
                        Description = job.Description,
                        FileName = (job) => {
                                  // primitive logic not 
                                  // worth to become a named method
                                  try { return job.Files[0].LocalName); }
                                  catch { return null as string; }
                                 }
                   };

This code produces the following justified compiler error:

cannot assign lambda expression to anonymous type property

The code above would set the delegate to the FileName property. But that is not my aim. I want the code work like this but without naming the method:

var jobSummaries = from job in jobs
                   where ...
                   select new 
                   {
                        ID = job.ID,
                        Description = job.Description,
                        FileName = this.ExtractFileName(job)
                   };

...
private string ExtractFileName(Job job)
{
     try { return Path.GetFileName(job.Files[0].LocalName); }
     catch { return null as string; }
}

Any suggestions?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

To call an anonymous function directly, this works:

int result = new Func<int, int>( (int i) =>{ return i + 5; } ).Invoke(3);
// result = 8

But I agree, int result = (i => i + 5)(3); would be way cooler =)

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As far as I know, you can't inline lambda expressions like that because a lamda expression is an instance itself (of the type Expression<Func<T>> or similar).

However, you can do this (updated with calculation of fileName, since this is now provided by the OP):

var jobSummaries = from job in jobs
                   where ...
                   let fileName = job.Files.Select(f => f.LocalName).FirstOrDefault()
                   select new 
                   {
                        ID = job.ID,
                        Description = job.Description,
                        FileName = fileName
                   };

Notice the use of the let keyword, that lets you extract the filename from the job variable directly inside the LINQ expression.

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I just tried. I cannot set lambda expression as a local variable with 'let'. I updated the sample code. I have a try/catch which makes direct computing difficult. –  GarbageGuy Mar 3 '10 at 13:42
    
No, you can't assign a lambda expression to fileName. Just write the code: let fileName = Path.Combine(job.Folder, job.File) or whatever logic you need... –  Mark Seemann Mar 3 '10 at 13:46
    
Why the anonymous downvote? –  Mark Seemann Mar 3 '10 at 13:49
    
@GarbageGuy: I updated my answer to reflect your updated question, now that I know the algorithm you need. Notice that a try/catch isn't necessary. –  Mark Seemann Mar 3 '10 at 13:54
    
Maybe I miss something, but I do not get the point. Should the logic be computable as a single expression, I could inline it directly in the property assignment. But it contains try/catch (see the updated code sample), so it works neither with 'let' nor with direct assignment. –  GarbageGuy Mar 3 '10 at 13:57

The compiler is complaining because you are not calling your lambda function, you are defining it. If the compiler would let you, you'd have a FileName property that is a function rather than a value.

If you can write your "primitive logic" as an expression, you can write that directly in the assignment statement.

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How about using extension for select. So you can do your little logic inside

var jobSummaries = jobs.Select(j =>
            {
                var someVar = j + "bla";
                return new
                    {
                        somelogic = someVar
                    };

            });
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