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I am trying to optimize for a certain outcome genetic algorithm-style.

I provide a seed value as input to a function, which does some transformations and returns a "goodness value". I then pick the best seed values, and repeat the process until I've got a winner.

The challenge I've run into is that I want to run a finite number of trials for each step (say, 100 max) and the number of seed values changes widely from run to run. So just using a for loop to look through a list of seed values won't work for me.

Here is the solution I came up with to deal with a list not being an infinite iterator:

iterations = 100
rlist = list(d.keys())

    for lt in (itertools.repeat(rlist)):
        d = gatherseedvalues(directory)
        seed = random.choice(lt)
        goodness = goodnessgracious(seed)
        goodnessdict[seed] = goodness
        if len(goodnessdict) > iterations:
            break

Is there a more Pythonic way of doing this - both in terms of getting around the iterator restriction and the looping strategy?

Also, is using the len(goodnessdict) methodology appropriate or is there a more Pythonic way to break the loop?

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Where is goodnessdict initialised? You just want to iterate over the first 100 items in rlist right? Also correct me if I am wrong, you want to have 100 items to process in rlist even if len(rlist)<100.? –  shshank May 17 '14 at 19:34
2  
seems like you just want while True: instead of your for loop, no? –  roippi May 17 '14 at 19:37
    
Do you want to take a random sample of seed values from rlist? Your code doesn't appear to handle repeated seeds well (the result from a later use overwrites the result from any previous one), but is that something you want to allow? If @shshank has it right and len(rlist) might be less than iterations, you're current code would run forever, but it's not clear what you'd want to do instead. –  Blckknght May 17 '14 at 19:48
    
@shshank rlist is arbitrarily long - if it has a length of ten, i'd want to iterate through it 10x (100 total attempts). if it has a length of 500, i'd want to process the first 100 items. –  SQLesion May 17 '14 at 23:24
    
@Blckknght the "goodness" for any seed is not the same each time, but the possible values are constrained. i'm doing a series of transformations which have bounds, so if I infinitely passed in the same seed i'd get the same values. so what i'm looking to do is sample those possible goodness values based on a selection of seeds, throw out the worst ones, and eventually get a top seed as a form of optimization. I should allow for multiple seeds - so i'll edit for that. but the larger question of how to do the repeated iterations remains. –  SQLesion May 17 '14 at 23:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on your comment:

rlist is arbitrarily long - if it has a length of ten, i'd want to iterate through it 10x (100 total attempts). if it has a length of 500, i'd want to process the first 100 items.

What you're looking for is itertools.cycle and itertools.islice:

for item in itertools.islice(itertools.cycle(rlist), iterations):
    # do something with item from rlist

This will iterate iterations times, taking an item from rlist on each go, starting over at the start if it reaches the end of the list.

Here's an example with a range:

for x in itertools.islice(itertools.cycle(range(4)), 10):
    print(x)

This will print:

0
1
2
3
0
1
2
3
0
1
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thank you! this definitely makes more sense than what i'd attempted –  SQLesion May 18 '14 at 17:01

I agree with one of the comments. In python the do ... while concept is generally approached (using a few of your variable names) as:

while True:
  if len(goodnessdict) > iterations:
    break
  # The rest of your code for the loop body here.

Is the result of goodnessgracious(seed) determinate? I.E, does it always produce the same output for the same seed? If so, your function shouldn't ever need to check the goodness for a single seed more than once and you could also improve the loop with this:

while True:
  seed = random.choice(lt)
  if seed in goodnessdict:
    continue
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