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I normally use the following idiom to check if a String can be converted to an integer.

public boolean isInteger( String input ) {
    try {
        Integer.parseInt( input );
        return true;
    }
    catch( Exception e ) {
        return false;
    }
}

Is it just me, or does this seem a bit hackish? What's a better way?


See my answer (with benchmarks, based on the earlier answer by CodingWithSpike) to see why I've reversed my position and accepted Jonas Klemming's answer to this problem. I think this original code will be used by most people because it's quicker to implement, and more maintainable, but it's orders of magnitude slower when non-integer data is provided.

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24 Answers 24

up vote 56 down vote accepted

If you are not concerned with potential overflow problems this function will perform about 20-30 times faster than using Integer.parseInt().

public static boolean isInteger(String str) {
	if (str == null) {
		return false;
	}
	int length = str.length();
	if (length == 0) {
		return false;
	}
	int i = 0;
	if (str.charAt(0) == '-') {
		if (length == 1) {
			return false;
		}
		i = 1;
	}
	for (; i < length; i++) {
		char c = str.charAt(i);
		if (c <= '/' || c >= ':') {
			return false;
		}
	}
	return true;
}
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23  
(c <= '/' || c >= ':') is a bit strange looking. I would have used (c < '0' || c > '9')... are the <= and >= operators faster in Java? –  Anonymous Oct 26 '08 at 1:43
1  
Why not use regex? Isn't return str.matches("^-?\\d+$") identical to code above. –  Maglob Oct 26 '08 at 9:28
4  
I would use this method or the original method from the question before regex. This for performance, the original method for speed of implementation and sheer maintainability. The regex solution has nothing going for it. –  Bill the Lizard Oct 26 '08 at 13:19
1  
Why not use java.lang.Character.isDigit()? –  Eric Weilnau Oct 26 '08 at 14:34
4  
isDigit returns true for things like Devanagari digits. While Integer.parseInt handles these as digits, it may not be what's expected for most use cases. –  erickson Nov 18 '08 at 16:27

You have it, but you should only catch NumberFormatException.

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1  
Yeah, it's considered bad form to catch more exceptions than you need. –  phasetwenty Oct 26 '08 at 1:28
    
You're right. NFE is the only one that can be thrown, but it's still a bad habit to get into. –  Bill the Lizard Oct 26 '08 at 3:26
    
I think a NPE can be thrown if input is null, so your method should probably handle that explicitly, whichever way you want to. –  Dov Wasserman Oct 26 '08 at 8:07
    
@Dov: You're right NPE and NFE should both be explicitly caught. –  Bill the Lizard Oct 26 '08 at 12:35
    
This response should be the true answer to this question. –  Breedly Feb 10 '12 at 3:51

Did a quick benchmark. Exceptions aren't actually that expensivve, unless you start popping back multiple methods and the JVM has to do a lot of work to get the execution stack in place. When staying in the same method, they aren't bad performers.

public void RunTests()
{
    String str = "1234567890";

    long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
        IsInt_ByException(str);
    long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("ByException: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
        IsInt_ByRegex(str);
    endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("ByRegex: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
        IsInt_ByJonas(str);
    endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("ByJonas: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);
}

private boolean IsInt_ByException(String str)
{
    try
    {
        Integer.parseInt(str);
        return true;
    }
    catch(NumberFormatException nfe)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

private boolean IsInt_ByRegex(String str)
{
    return str.matches("^-?\\d+$");
}

public boolean IsInt_ByJonas(String str)
{
    if (str == null) {
            return false;
    }
    int length = str.length();
    if (length == 0) {
            return false;
    }
    int i = 0;
    if (str.charAt(0) == '-') {
            if (length == 1) {
                    return false;
            }
            i = 1;
    }
    for (; i < length; i++) {
            char c = str.charAt(i);
            if (c <= '/' || c >= ':') {
                    return false;
            }
    }
    return true;
}

Output:

ByException: 31

ByRegex: 453

ByJonas: 16

I do agree that Jonas K's solution is the most robust too. Looks like he wins :)

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4  
Great idea to benchmark all three. To be fair to the Regex and Jonas methods, you should test with non-integer strings, since that's where the Integer.parseInt method is going to really slow down. –  Bill the Lizard Oct 26 '08 at 13:00
2  
Sorry but this regex test is not good. (1) You don't need to make regex engine check for ^ and $ second time since in matches entire string must match regex, (2) str.matches each time will have to create its own Pattern which is expensive. For performance reasons we should create such Pattern only once outside this method and use it inside. (3) We can also create only one Matcher object and use its reset(CharSequence) to pass user data and return its matches() result. –  Pshemo Nov 6 '13 at 15:01
    
So something like private final Matcher m = Pattern.compile("-?\\d+").matcher(""); private boolean byRegex(String str) { return m.reset(str).matches(); } should have better performance. –  Pshemo Nov 6 '13 at 15:02

It partly depend on what you mean by "can be converted to an integer".

If you mean "can be converted into an int in Java" then the answer from Jonas is a good start, but doesn't quite finish the job. It would pass 999999999999999999999999999999 for example. I would add the normal try/catch call from your own question at the end of the method.

The character-by-character checks will efficiently reject "not an integer at all" cases, leaving "it's an integer but Java can't handle it" cases to be caught by the slower exception route. You could do this bit by hand too, but it would be a lot more complicated.

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Since there's possibility that people still visit here and will be biased against Regex after the benchmarks... So i'm gonna give an updated version of the benchmark, with a compiled version of the Regex. Which opposed to the previous benchmarks, this one shows Regex solution actually has consistently good performance.

Copied from Bill the Lizard and updated with compiled version:

private final Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("^-?\\d+$");

public void runTests() {
    String big_int = "1234567890";
    String non_int = "1234XY7890";

    long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
            IsInt_ByException(big_int);
    long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("ByException - integer data: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
            IsInt_ByException(non_int);
    endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("ByException - non-integer data: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
            IsInt_ByRegex(big_int);
    endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("\nByRegex - integer data: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
            IsInt_ByRegex(non_int);
    endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("ByRegex - non-integer data: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
            IsInt_ByCompiledRegex(big_int);
    endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("\nByCompiledRegex - integer data: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
            IsInt_ByCompiledRegex(non_int);
    endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("ByCompiledRegex - non-integer data: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);


    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
            IsInt_ByJonas(big_int);
    endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("\nByJonas - integer data: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
            IsInt_ByJonas(non_int);
    endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("ByJonas - non-integer data: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);
}

private boolean IsInt_ByException(String str)
{
    try
    {
        Integer.parseInt(str);
        return true;
    }
    catch(NumberFormatException nfe)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

private boolean IsInt_ByRegex(String str)
{
    return str.matches("^-?\\d+$");
}

private boolean IsInt_ByCompiledRegex(String str) {
    return pattern.matcher(str).find();
}

public boolean IsInt_ByJonas(String str)
{
    if (str == null) {
            return false;
    }
    int length = str.length();
    if (length == 0) {
            return false;
    }
    int i = 0;
    if (str.charAt(0) == '-') {
            if (length == 1) {
                    return false;
            }
            i = 1;
    }
    for (; i < length; i++) {
            char c = str.charAt(i);
            if (c <= '/' || c >= ':') {
                    return false;
            }
    }
    return true;
}

Results:

ByException - integer data: 45
ByException - non-integer data: 465

ByRegex - integer data: 272
ByRegex - non-integer data: 131

ByCompiledRegex - integer data: 45
ByCompiledRegex - non-integer data: 26

ByJonas - integer data: 8
ByJonas - non-integer data: 2
share|improve this answer
1  
The ByCompiledRegex time needs to include compiling the regex in its time measurement. –  Martin Carney Dec 23 '13 at 20:53
    
@MartinCarney I modified it and benchmarked pattern compilation. Obviously my CPU/JIT is faster, but if I interpolate it back, the compilation time is 336. –  tedder42 Oct 8 at 23:26
    
to be clear, that 336 (ms) is what happens when the pattern compilation is done 100k times, just like all the other lines. With the implication that it's only done once, its time is basically zero. –  tedder42 Oct 8 at 23:50
org.apache.commons.lang.StringUtils.isNumeric

though Java's standard lib really misses such utility functions

I think that Apache Commons is a "must have" for every Java programmer

too bad it isn't ported to Java5 yet

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1  
The only problem with this is overflow :S I still give you +1 for mentioning commons-lang :) –  javamonkey79 Jul 27 '10 at 23:55
1  
The other problem is negative numbers, but I also +1, since in my view this approach comes closest to a good solution. –  sandris Jan 9 '13 at 7:38

I copied the code from rally25rs answer and added some tests for non-integer data. The results are undeniably in favor of the method posted by Jonas Klemming. The results for the Exception method that I originally posted are pretty good when you have integer data, but they're the worst when you don't, while the results for the RegEx solution (that I'll bet a lot of people use) were consistently bad. See Felipe's answer for a compiled regex example, which is much faster.

public void runTests()
{
    String big_int = "1234567890";
    String non_int = "1234XY7890";

    long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
        IsInt_ByException(big_int);
    long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("ByException - integer data: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
        IsInt_ByException(non_int);
    endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("ByException - non-integer data: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
        IsInt_ByRegex(big_int);
    endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("\nByRegex - integer data: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
        IsInt_ByRegex(non_int);
    endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("ByRegex - non-integer data: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
        IsInt_ByJonas(big_int);
    endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("\nByJonas - integer data: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
        IsInt_ByJonas(non_int);
    endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.print("ByJonas - non-integer data: ");
    System.out.println(endTime - startTime);
}

private boolean IsInt_ByException(String str)
{
    try
    {
        Integer.parseInt(str);
        return true;
    }
    catch(NumberFormatException nfe)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

private boolean IsInt_ByRegex(String str)
{
    return str.matches("^-?\\d+$");
}

public boolean IsInt_ByJonas(String str)
{
    if (str == null) {
            return false;
    }
    int length = str.length();
    if (length == 0) {
            return false;
    }
    int i = 0;
    if (str.charAt(0) == '-') {
            if (length == 1) {
                    return false;
            }
            i = 1;
    }
    for (; i < length; i++) {
            char c = str.charAt(i);
            if (c <= '/' || c >= ':') {
                    return false;
            }
    }
    return true;
}

Results:

ByException - integer data: 47
ByException - non-integer data: 547

ByRegex - integer data: 390
ByRegex - non-integer data: 313

ByJonas - integer data: 0
ByJonas - non-integer data: 16
share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks for picking up my slack! :) –  CodingWithSpike Oct 26 '08 at 18:28
1  
Thanks for writing the original benchmark. I never would have guessed that regex was that bad, or that throwing exceptions was that much worse. –  Bill the Lizard Oct 26 '08 at 22:29

Just one comment about regexp. Every example provided here is wrong!. If you want to use regexp don't forget that compiling the pattern take a lot of time. This:

str.matches("^-?\\d+$")

and also this:

Pattern.matches("-?\\d+", input);

causes compile of pattern in every method call. To used it correctly follow:

import java.util.regex.Pattern;

/**
 * @author Rastislav Komara
 */
public class NaturalNumberChecker {
    public static final Pattern PATTENR = Pattern.compile("^\\d+$");

    boolean isNaturalNumber(CharSequence input) {
        return input != null && PATTENR.matcher(input).matches();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
4  
You can squeeze out a little more performance by creating the Matcher ahead of time, too, and using its reset() method to apply it to the input. –  Alan Moore Oct 27 '08 at 5:43

You can use the matches method of the string class. The [0-9] represents all the values it can be, the + means it must be at least one character long, and the * means it can be zero or more characters long.

boolean isNumeric = yourString.matches("[0-9]+"); // 1 or more characters long, numbers only
boolean isNumeric = yourString.matches("[0-9]*"); // 0 or more characters long, numbers only
share|improve this answer

This is shorter, but shorter isn't necessarily better (and it won't catch integer values which are out of range, as pointed out in danatel's comment):

input.matches("^-?\\d+$");

Personally, since the implementation is squirrelled away in a helper method and correctness trumps length, I would just go with something like what you have (minus catching the base Exception class rather than NumberFormatException).

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1  
And maybe \\d{1,10} is, although not perfect, better than \\d+ for catching Java Integers –  Maglob Oct 25 '08 at 23:15
is_number = true;
try {
  Integer.parseInt(mystr)
} catch (NumberFormatException  e) {
  is_number = false;
}
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2  
This is doing the exact same thing the poster is asking about. –  Martin Carney Dec 23 '13 at 21:00

How about:

return Pattern.matches("-?\\d+", input);
share|improve this answer
    
What about the integer 9999999999999999999999999999999999 ? –  danatel Oct 25 '08 at 23:06
    
Don't forget to check for the negative sign. –  Jeremy Ruten Oct 25 '08 at 23:06
    
don't you need to anchor the begining and end of the regex, so you won't pass "aaa-1999zzz"? –  Tim Howland Oct 26 '08 at 13:08
1  
Tim, when you call one of the matches() methods (String, Pattern and Matcher each have one), the regex has to match the whole input, making anchors redundant. To find a match as defined by most other regex flavors, you have to use Matcher#find(). –  Alan Moore Oct 27 '08 at 5:23

What you did works, but you probably shouldn't always check that way. Throwing exceptions should be reserved for "exceptional" situations (maybe that fits in your case, though), and are very costly in terms of performance.

share|improve this answer
    
They're only costly if they get thrown. –  Bill the Lizard Oct 26 '08 at 12:52
    
didn't realize.. thanks! –  lucas Oct 26 '08 at 16:56

You can also use the Scanner class, and use hasNextInt() - and this allows you to test for other types, too, like floats, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer gave me a reminder I needed. I completely forgot Scanner had such a function. T-up –  Hubro Oct 26 '10 at 14:15

You probably need to take the use case in account too:

If most of the time you expect numbers to be valid, then catching the exception is only causing a performance overhead when attempting to convert invalid numbers. Whereas calling some isInteger() method and then convert using Integer.parseInt() will always cause a performance overhead for valid numbers - the strings are parsed twice, once by the check and once by the conversion.

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If your String array contains pure Integers and Strings, code below should work. You only have to look at first character. e.g. ["4","44","abc","77","bond"]

if (Character.isDigit(string.charAt(0))) {
    //Do something with int
}
share|improve this answer

This is a modification of Jonas' code that checks if the string is within range to be cast into an integer.

public static boolean isInteger(String str) {
    if (str == null) {
        return false;
    }
    int length = str.length();
    int i = 0;
    int maxlength = 10;
    String maxnum = String.valueOf(Integer.MAX_VALUE);
    if (str.charAt(0) == '-') { 
        maxlength = 11;
        if (length == 1 || length > maxlength) { 
            return false; 
        } 
        i = 1;
        maxnum = String.valueOf(Integer.MIN_VALUE);
    }  
    else {
        if (length > maxlength) { 
            return false; 
        }
    } 
    for (int num = i; num < length; num++) {
        char c = str.charAt(num);
        if (c < '0' || c > '9') {
            return false;
        }
    }
    if (length == maxlength) {
        for (; i < length; i++) {
            if (str.charAt(i) < maxnum.charAt(i)) {
                return true;
            }
            else if (str.charAt(i) > maxnum.charAt(i)) {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
    return true;
}
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1  
looks good, but the last for-loop needs to have i reset to zero (or 1 if a negative number) because the loop that checks whether each digit is a number will result in i being the string length, therefore the last for-loop will never run. I would also use the Java constants Integer.MAX_VALUE and Integer.MIN_VALUE instead of the magic numbers. –  Tim the Enchanter Aug 21 at 15:42
    
@TimtheEnchanter Thank you for the suggestions, I completely overlooked them. In my edit to incorporate them I used a new variable in the first for loop to avoid the extra if statement. –  Wayne Aug 21 at 16:47

Integer.valueOf(string); works for me most of the time!

share|improve this answer
    
It's that (all - most) of the time that I'm worried about. :) –  Bill the Lizard Oct 26 '08 at 13:22
Number number;
try {
    number = NumberFormat.getInstance().parse("123");
} catch (ParseException e) {
    //not a number - do recovery.
    e.printStackTrace();
}
//use number
share|improve this answer

This would work only for positive integers.

public static boolean isInt(String str) {
    if (str != null && str.length() != 0) {
        for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
            if (!Character.isDigit(str.charAt(i))) return false;
        }
    }
    return true;        
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Welcome to stackoverflow. Before resurrecting an old thread be sure to read the previous responses and comments. This method (and possible disadvantages) were actually discussed already. –  Leigh Mar 31 '12 at 0:20

You just check NumberFormatException:-

 String value="123";
 try  
 {  
    int s=Integer.parseInt(any_int_val);
    // do something when integer values comes 
 }  
 catch(NumberFormatException nfe)  
 {  
          // do something when string values comes 
 }  
share|improve this answer

You may try apache utils

NumberUtils.isNumber( myText)

See the javadoc here

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For those readers who arrive here like me years after the question was asked, I have a more general solution for this question.

/**
 * Checks, if the string represents a number.
 *
 * @param string the string
 * @return true, if the string is a number
 */
public static boolean isANumber(final String string) {
    if (string != null) {
        final int length = string.length();
        if (length != 0) {
            int i = 0;
            if (string.charAt(0) == '-') {
                if (length == 1) {
                    return false;
                }
                i++;
            }
            for (; i < length; i++) {
                final char c = string.charAt(i);
                if ((c <= PERIOD) || ((c >= COLON))) {
                    final String strC = Character.toString(c).toUpperCase();
                    final boolean isExponent = strC.equals("E");
                    final boolean isPeriod = (c == PERIOD);
                    final boolean isPlus = (c == PLUS);

                    if (!isExponent && !isPeriod && !isPlus) {
                        return false;
                    }
                }
            }
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Try/catch is designed to be used when you really don't have control over what could go wrong. In this case - you can and the accepted answer is still a good solution today. Also, throwing exceptions is expensive and should be avoided. –  ılǝ May 27 at 7:23

Try the int.tryparse it will provide a value of zero if the string cannot be converted and it will also convert the string it can be done very usefull

share|improve this answer
3  
Java doesn't have a Integer.TryParse() unless Oracle added it in the last three days. Oh, how I wish it did though.... –  mikeTheLiar Nov 27 '12 at 21:34

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