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There are many questions similar to this but I haven't found solution there.

How can I get CPU temperature in C or C++ on Linux Ubuntu 12.10 without call to sensors? I can of course just read it from file, however I cannot find where it is stored in 12.10. And is simple reading a text file only possibility or maybe I can query the kernel using system call or signal?

Content of my folder /proc/acpi/ is just

event  wakeup

No THEMP0 there or anything like this. sensors application however can display a temperature on my machine.

no /sys/class/thermal/thermal_zone0/ directory

in /sys/class/thermal I have

cooling_device0@  cooling_device1@  cooling_device2@  cooling_device3@

I'm trying to browse lm-sensors source code in search for how it retrieves temperature, to no avail so far, however I am close. The file is

http://lm-sensors.org/browser/lm-sensors/trunk/lib/sysfs.c

in particular:

line 846:

846 int sensors_read_sysfs_attr(const sensors_chip_name *name,
847                             const sensors_subfeature *subfeature,
848                             double *value)
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strace -f /usr/bin/sensors 2>&1 |grep open to see what sensors opens up, might give you a clue. –  nos May 17 '14 at 22:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

According to the sysfs documentation, the sensors information is stored under /sys/class/hwmon with different directory for each chip. Which is consistent with the outputs I see on my Ubuntu 13.10.

The files used by sensors are:

/sys/class/hwmon/hwmon*/device/temp*

Depending on the number chips/virtual devices, there can be many hwmon directories.

Output on my dual core system:

$ pwd
/sys/class/hwmon
$ ls -l
total 0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 May 17 14:29 hwmon0 -> ../../devices/virtual/hwmon/hwmon0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 May 17 14:29 hwmon1 -> ../../devices/platform/coretemp.0/hwmon/hwmon1
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 May 17 14:29 hwmon2 -> ../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:01.0/0000:01:00.0/hwmon/hwmon2

Where hwmon1 is the one for my CPUs:

$ pwd
/sys/class/hwmon/hwmon1/device
$ ls -l
total 0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    0 May 17 14:29 driver -> ../../../bus/platform/drivers/coretemp
drwxr-xr-x 3 root root    0 May 17 14:29 hwmon
-r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 May 17 23:21 modalias
-r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 May 17 14:29 name
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    0 May 17 23:21 power
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    0 May 17 14:29 subsystem -> ../../../bus/platform
-r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 May 17 14:29 temp2_crit
-r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 May 17 14:29 temp2_crit_alarm
-r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 May 17 14:29 temp2_input
-r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 May 17 23:11 temp2_label
-r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 May 17 14:29 temp2_max
-r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 May 17 14:29 temp3_crit
-r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 May 17 14:29 temp3_crit_alarm
-r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 May 17 14:29 temp3_input
-r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 May 17 23:11 temp3_label
-r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 May 17 14:29 temp3_max
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 4096 May 17 14:29 uevent

The values from temp2* and temp3* correspond to core 0 and core 1 respectively. Basically these are the files sensors read data from. Depending on your hardware devices you have, your CPU directory (hwmon1 in my case) with temperature information may be different.

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thanks, /sys/class/hwmon/hwmon2/device/temp1_input is what I was looking for –  AB_ May 18 '14 at 0:01

Based on lm-sensors and answer of Blue Moon I have written this code that works fine on Ubuntu 12.10 with AMD FX 4100 Quad Core processor:

int main(void) {

    double value;
    int TEMP_IDX_MAX = 3;
    FILE *f;
    const char* n[] = {"/sys/class/hwmon/hwmon0/device/temp1_input",
                       "/sys/class/hwmon/hwmon0/device/temp2_input",
                       "/sys/class/hwmon/hwmon0/device/temp3_input"};

    for ( int i = 0; i < TEMP_IDX_MAX; ++i) {
        if ( ( f = fopen( n[i], "r"))) {

            int res, err = 0;
            errno = 0;
            res = fscanf( f, "%lf", &value);
            if ( res == EOF && errno == EIO)
                err = -SENSORS_ERR_IO;
            else if ( res != 1)
                err = -SENSORS_ERR_ACCESS_R;
            res = fclose( f);
            if ( err)
                return err;

            if ( res == EOF) {
                if ( errno == EIO)
                    return -SENSORS_ERR_IO;
                else
                    return -SENSORS_ERR_ACCESS_R;
            }
            value /= get_type_scaling( SENSORS_SUBFEATURE_TEMP_INPUT);
        } else
            return -SENSORS_ERR_KERNEL;

        printf( "%lf\n", value);
    }

    return 0;
}

A code (this is just example) can be found here, and here is a logging tool.

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/sys/class/hwmon/hwmonX/device/name can be used to check whether it's hardware you are interested in (coretemp for CPU) to make more portable as CPU dir (hwmon2) may not be same on all machines even using same OS. –  Blue Moon May 19 '14 at 15:23

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