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I tried to use if(!cin) to validate if the user input really is an integer. However my programm then just goes into an infinite loop never asking vor new input

do{
    cin >> temp->data;
    if(!cin){
        cout << "Please enter a Number!" << '\n';
        correct=false;
        }
   }while(correct==false);

Would be great if someone could help me :)

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2  
you need to clear the stream's error condition. but better separate the tasks of reading a line and parsing it. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf May 17 at 21:46
    

4 Answers 4

When std::cin fails to read the input, the appropriate error flags are set. Therefore you want to reset the flags using std::cin.clear() so that the next input operation will work correctly and then skip everything until the new line using std::cin.ignore(..) in order to avoid similarly formatted input.

while (!(std::cin >> temp->data))
{
        std::cin.clear();
        std::cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n');
        std::cout << "\nPlease enter a number!" << std::endl;
}

std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max() returns the max amount of characters a stream can hold so that the whole line is guaranteed to be ignored.

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our solutions are pretty close, but I'm not really sure whether seelenkuchen really intended to skip the first prompt... –  Jeff May 17 at 22:14
    
" Please enter a number! " feels like an error message in case the user did not enter a number as expected. Otherwise there are many ways he can go about it, either by writing another std::cout outside the loop, by using logical operators or using a break like in your answer. –  Veritas May 17 at 22:17
    
Your operator precedence is broken in your test I think. ! before >>, right? –  Jeff May 17 at 22:21
    
You are correct. In fact I was just doublechecking operator precedence. –  Veritas May 17 at 22:24
1  
I just noticed the "!" in his message, assuming that there should be no first prompt, deleting my answer in favor of yours. –  Jeff May 17 at 22:27

If you want to do that kind of check, read the data from cin to a string and convert the string to a number:

string str;
do{
    cin >> str;
    if(!cin){
        cout << "Please enter a Number!" << '\n';
        correct=false;
        }
    else{
        istringstream stream(str);
        stream >> temp->data;
        if(!stream){
            cout << "Please enter a Number!" << '\n';
            correct=false;
        }
     }

   }while(correct==false);
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Use cin.fail() to check whether the user entered correct input. cin.fail() returns true if the last cin command failed, and false otherwise. Moreover, your loop is likely to be infinite, so you must also state an else where you will set the check flag correct to true. Thus, to invalidate the loop's condition and exit the loop in the case user entered correct input (see code below):

do{
    cin >> temp->data;
    if(cin.fail()){
        cin.clear();
        cin.ignore(10000, '\n');
        cout << "Please enter a Number!" << '\n';
        correct=false;
     } else {
        correct=true;
     }
}while(correct==false);
share|improve this answer
    
move the correct = false to a declaration/initialization before do and just make the test } while (!correct); –  Jeff May 17 at 21:50
1  
How is OP going to learn anything from this when you paste in corrected code with no explanation? –  harmic May 17 at 21:50
1  
This is a really obfuscated way to go about input. –  Veritas May 17 at 22:03
    
@Veritas Verum quidem dicis. –  101010 May 17 at 22:07
    
@Veritas as your name says, you are speaking the truth. Nevertheless, the OP didn't ask for the most elegant and efficient way to go about input. He asked why his loop goes infinite. –  101010 May 17 at 22:14

Your 'correct' variable actually doesn't do anything the way you are using it. It's not possible to exit the loop without correct being true; so you could do away with it, and just use a loop-exiting command when you have read the number.

Also, none of the answers posted so far handle the input being closed. They would go into an infinite loop in that scenario.

// A loop; we will break out when we successfully read a number.
while ( 1 )
{
// Prompt for a number and read it
    cout << "Please enter a Number!" << endl;
    cin >> temp->data;

// Exit loop if we successfully read
    if ( cin )
         break;

// Check to see if we failed due to the input being closed
    if ( cin.eof() )
    {
        cerr << "End of input reached.\n";
        return 0;   // depends what your function returns of course
    }

// reset the error condition that was caused by trying to read an integer and failing
    cin.clear();

// discard anything they previously typed
    cin.ignore(numeric_limits<streamsize>::max(), '\n');
}

Moving on from this, a good design would be to actually have this code be an entire function in itself. Then you can call the function whenever you need to get a number safely, without needing to duplicate code. The function declaration might be:

void input_number(int &the_number, std::istream &in, std::string prompt);

which would output the_number, and it would handle end-of-file either by throwing an exception, or by relying on the caller to check for !cin, or even by returning a bool; whatever fits in best with your error handling overall.

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The ignore member function stops at eof regardless of the character specified. –  Veritas May 18 at 18:02
    
@Veritas one would hope so. Is that relevant to something I posted? –  Matt McNabb May 18 at 21:36
    
Just saying that I don't understand your reasoning for getting stuck in an infinite loop in the case of eof when there is no input indirection involved. –  Veritas May 18 at 21:46
    
Your post and 40two's post both get stuck in an infinite loop when cin.eof() happens. The only way for your loop to exit is if a number is successfully read, and that can't happen after eof. –  Matt McNabb May 18 at 21:51
    
No it doesn't , at least on my machine. How are you entering eof? –  Veritas May 18 at 22:32

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