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(I was astonished not to be able to find this question already on stackoverflow, which I can only put down to poor googling on my part, by all means point out the duplicate...)

Here is a toy class that returns the reverse of what you put into it. Currently it works on integers, but would require only very minor changes to work for String.

public class Mirror {

  int value;

  public int get() {
    return reverse(value);
  }

  private int reverse(int value2) {
    String valueString = value + "";
    String newString = reverse(valueString);
    return Integer.parseInt(newString);
  }

  private String reverse(String valueString) {
    String newString = "";
    for (char c : valueString.toCharArray()) {
      newString = c + newString;
    }
    return newString;
  }

  public void set(int value) {
    this.value = value;
  }

}

What I'd like to do is make the class generic, but only for, say, two or three possible types. So what I want to write is:

public class Mirror<X, where X is one of Integer, String, or MagicValue {

X value

public X get(){
[...]

What's the correct syntax? My Google-fu is failing me... :(

EDIT: it appears there isn't a correct syntax and it can't appear to be done, so my main question is: why? this seems like the sort of thing that people might want to do before they made the class truly generic...

EDIT EDIT: Managed to work out the why with some labmates today, so added the relevant why answer below.

share|improve this question
    
Create two or three methods that return the correct type and take the correct type as argument. –  arynaq May 18 '14 at 12:56
1  
I think all of the types would need to be in the same class hierarchy for this.. Which doesn't feel like a good solution for every case –  Zavior May 18 '14 at 12:57
    
@arynaq, I'm not sure I understand - how does that help? –  Joe May 18 '14 at 12:58
    
@Zavior - wait, you mean I might have accidentally asked an original question? –  Joe May 18 '14 at 12:59
1  
Just a heads-up: the StringBuilder class has a built in reverse method that you could use instead of yours, so you could just call new StringBuilder(valueString).reverse().toString() –  user184994 May 18 '14 at 13:00

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Unfortunately java does not provide such functionality directly. However I can suggest you the following work around:

Create parametrized class Mirror with private constructor and 3 static factory methods that create instance of Mirror with specific parameter:

public class Mirror<T> {
    private T value
    private Mirror(T value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public static Mirror<Integer> integerMirror(Integer value) {
        return new Mirror(value);
    } 

    public static Mirror<String> stringMirror(String value) {
        return new Mirror(value);
    } 

    public static Mirror<MagicValue> magicMirror(MagicValue value) {
        return new Mirror(value);
    } 
}

EDIT Obviously you can (and probably should) separate the class Mirror from its creating, e.g. put the factory methods to separate class MirrorFactory. In this case the constructor should become package protected.

If you want to support large yet limited number of classes you can implement only one generic factory method

    public static <T> Mirror<T> createMirror(T value) {
        checkTypeSupported(value);
        return new Mirror(value);
    } 

Method checkTypeSupported(value); may use some kind of metadatat (e.g. properties, JSON etc file) to get supported types. In this case however you will not enjoy the compile time validation.

Other solution is to require that all supported types extend certain base class or implement interface:

public class Mirror<T extends MyInterface> {}

But this solution seems does not match your requirements since you need Integer, String and MagicValue.

share|improve this answer
    
So that solves my problem of restricting creation, but do I not end up having to put a reasonable amount of unclear boilerplate into my Mirror class to support all the types that will never be instantiated? (i.e do I also have to write public X reverse(X in){return X;} to get compilation to happen even though I know it will never be called?) –  Joe May 18 '14 at 13:11
    
@Joe, plz take a look on my edit. I hope it helps. I did not understand however what does method reverse() do. –  AlexR May 18 '14 at 13:19
    
assert reverse(123)==321; assert reverse("hello").equals("olleh"); assert reverse(new HashMap())==bad programmer... ;0) –  Joe May 18 '14 at 13:21
    
Please, correct 3rd method name from integerMirror to magicValueMirror as my edit for this was rejected –  Dmitry Ginzburg May 18 '14 at 13:21
    
wouldn't you make the constructor private? –  Bohemian May 18 '14 at 13:47

Various ways to do what you need...Here is another option. No getter or setter.
One instance of Mirror for each type to be handled. One reverse() method. Tweak as necessary. Add error checking/handling.

public class Mirror<T> {

public T reverse(final T value) {
    T result = null;
    while (true) {
        if (value instanceof String) {
            System.out.println("Do for String");
            result = value;
            break;
        }
        if (value instanceof Integer) {
            System.out.println("Do for Integer");
            result = value;
            break;
        }
        if (value instanceof JFrame) {
            System.out.println("Do for JFrame");
            result = value;
            break;
        }
        throw new RuntimeException("ProgramCheck: Missing handler for type " + value.getClass().getSimpleName());
    }
    return result;
}

Tester:

    final Mirror<String> testerString = new Mirror<>();
    testerString.reverse("string");

    final Mirror<Integer> testerInteger = new Mirror<>();
    testerInteger.reverse(41);
    testerInteger.reverse(42);
    testerInteger.reverse(43);

    final Mirror<JFrame> testerJFrame = new Mirror<>();
    testerJFrame.reverse(new JFrame());

Results:

Do for String
Do for Integer
Do for Integer
Do for Integer
Do for JFrame
share|improve this answer

An alternative would be to just accept the fact that you have no control over the type hierarchy of String/Integer and create an interface to give a common type for the classes you do have control over

public int reverse(int value) {
    return Integer.valueOf(new StringBuilder(value + "").reverse()
            .toString());
}

public String reverse(String value) {
    return new StringBuilder(value + "").reverse().toString();
}

public <T extends Reversible> T reverse(T value) {
    value.reverse();
    return value;
}

public interface Reversible {
    public void reverse();
}
share|improve this answer

And if you only want one instance of the Mirror class...use a generic method.

public class Mirror {

public <T> T reverse(final T value) {
    T result = null;
    while (true) {
        if (value instanceof String) {
            System.out.println("Do for String");
            result = value;
            break;
        }
        if (value instanceof Integer) {
            System.out.println("Do for Integer");
            result = value;
            break;
        }
        if (value instanceof JFrame) {
            System.out.println("Do for JFrame");
            result = value;
            break;
        }
        throw new RuntimeException("ProgramCheck: Missing handler for type " + value.getClass().getSimpleName());
    }
    return result;
}

tester:

    final Mirror tester = new Mirror();
    String s = tester.reverse("string");
    Integer i41 = tester.reverse(41);
    Integer i42 = tester.reverse(42);
    Integer i43 = tester.reverse(43);
    JFrame j = tester.reverse(new JFrame());

results:

Do for String
Do for Integer
Do for Integer
Do for Integer
Do for JFrame
share|improve this answer
    
Why would you use while(true) instead of chaining the if blocks with else? –  Artjom B. May 18 '14 at 15:27
1  
Either is fine - personal choice - while(true) seems to make cleaner code. Agree?? –  Java42 May 18 '14 at 22:43
    
@Java42 - Exactly –  dubermen May 19 '14 at 17:21

You can't bound a generic parameter to range of values. You could however restrict it programatically:

public abstract class AbstractMirror<T> {

    T value;

    protected AbstractMirror(Class<T> clazz) {
        if (clazz != Integer.class && clazz != String.class && clazz != MagicValue.class)
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    }

    public abstract T get();

    protected abstract T reverse(T value);

}
share|improve this answer

You can use so-called "witness" types to make the compiler do what you want.

public interface Reversible< T > {
    public static final class IntReversible implements Reversible< Integer > {}
    public static final class StringReversible implements Reversible< String > {}
    public static final class MagicReversible implements Reversible< MagicValue > {}
}

public abstract class Mirror< T, R extends Reversible< T > > {
    // ...
}

public class IntMirror extends Mirror< Integer, IntReversible > {
    // ...
}

However, the reason your example doesn't make any sense is because you gain virtually nothing from using a generic in this context. What possible algorithm will reverse an integer or a string or a MagicValue without resorting to awful run-time type-checking and casting? The code will be all three reverse algorithms, wrapped with a hideous if-ladder.

share|improve this answer

So here is the why (worked it out at work)

Generics are always from a subclass, although it looks like

Public class Thing<T> {}

will allow any type in there, really what it's saying is that it will allow any subtype of Object. I.e.

Public class Thing<T extends Object> {}

This is effectively working as inheritance, and indeed, the Oracle Website shows us this happening when the syntactic sugar is removed:

In the following example, the generic Node class uses a bounded type parameter:

public class Node<T extends Comparable<T>> {

    private T data;
    private Node<T> next;

    public Node(T data, Node<T> next) {
        this.data = data;
        this.next = next;
    }

    public T getData() { return data; }
    // ...
}

The Java compiler replaces the bounded type parameter T with the first bound class, Comparable:

public class Node {

    private Comparable data;
    private Node next;

    public Node(Comparable data, Node next) {
        this.data = data;
        this.next = next;
    }

    public Comparable getData() { return data; }
    // ...
}

...and so the answer turns out that the reason you can't limit the types in this way is because it effectively turns into multiple Inheritance, which is nasty, and which I'm happy to avoid....

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