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  • Is it mandatory in some countries to make all websites accessible?

  • If so, what would happen if someone in country with this mandate does not make a website accessible?

  • Can the government remove or block the IP if the site is not accessible?

  • How could the government know if any website is not accessible? Do they check every single website?

  • Does only the people/company who make the inaccessible site get any notice from the government?

  • Why are there so many accessibility guidelines -- WACG 1, WCAG 2.0, DDA, Section 508, etc.? If the whole world follows W3C for XHTML and CSS, then why have some countries made their own guidelines?

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which country's government are you referring to? –  Vlad Mar 3 '10 at 15:11
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Some of these questions seem technical (although you'll need to give more info such as which government, the website(s) you're talking about, etc). Some are not technical at all and I don't know that we can really answer (such as what the government will do in various cases). –  SOA Nerd Mar 3 '10 at 15:15
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why do you think we'd know why any government does something? better ask that country's government. –  kajaco Mar 3 '10 at 15:17
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This is a valid question and has nothing to do with politics. The question is whether accessible web sites are enforced in some counties, similar to wheelchair accessible locations. Voting to reopen, even though it could use some localization. –  Pekka 웃 Mar 3 '10 at 15:19
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"What are the consequences of not being accessible?" Enforcers. Wheelchair-bound enforcers. Which is why my evil lair has stairs. –  dmckee Mar 3 '10 at 15:52
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is it mandatory in some countries to make all websites accessible?

Yes, particularly the United Kingdom, Ireland and Australia.

This is in order to comply with legislation that prevents discrimination against disabled people. While this is, or can be, seen as a burden I find it helps to think of it as widening your audience, consumer or user-base.

If so, what would happen if someone in country with this mandate does not make a website accessible?

Being a legal requirement means that a court is/will be able to impose sanctions, depending on their interpretation of the local laws, that might involve enforced compliance with the laws, a financial penalty (fines, etc) or some other punishment until compliance is established.

Can the government remove or block the IP if the site is not accessible?

That depends on which government and the specifics written into the laws. It seems unlikely that they would block the website because of non-compliance with accessibility legislation. It seems far more likely, though I am biased because of where I live (the United Kingdom), that reparations would be sought through the judicial system.

How could the government know if any website is not accessible? Do they check every single website?

In the United Kingdom it seems that complaints would be brought by disabled users that are prevented from successfully using/accessing the site or service. These complaints would likely be taken to the court system, see above.

It is even more likely that the user would inform the owner of the website directly, before bringing a complaint to court, in order to give you/the owners a chance to apologise (never underestimate the power of a sincere apology) and enhance the site.

[Do] only the people/company who make the inaccessible site get any notice from the government?

I would imagine, and this is why this isn't necessarily a great place to ask the question, that the owners would be notified. It is, however, quite likely that, as the site developer, you would quickly receive complaints from the owner of the site since you made it/designed it. But the legal burden of responsibility is likely to depend upon the contract under which you were employed/contracted.

If you feel that accessibility would add an undue burden upon yourself, it's always worth specifying to the client the costs of adding compliance with accessibility requirements, and telling them of the specific laws under which they are requirements.

But, for this, you need to speak to a lawyer.

Why are there so many accessibility guidelines -- WACG 1, WCAG 2.0, DDA, Section 508, etc.? If the whole world follows W3C for XHTML and CSS, then why have some countries made their own guidelines?

Because all laws are set locally, or, in some cases, internationally via treaties. The W3C can make suggestions and guidelines, but it is not, thankfully for IE, illegal not to comply with CSS2.1. It is, however, illegal not to comply with the DDA (Disability Discrimination Act) in the United Kingdom.


All the above is not the advice of a qualified legal representative, or counsel. For specific advice consult a lawyer who practices the law in the country/region in which your client is based, or in which your website/product will accessible.

This would imply a lawyer from the United Kingdom for a British local government website, for a German authority website it would, of course, imply the services of a lawyer from Germany.


Is it only mandatory to make site accessible for Govt. own website and for stock exchange listed corporate sites. or for all type of sites?

I can't speak as to the exact requirements, since I'm not a lawyer. However a quick Google turns up the following web-page that seems to address this question: http://www.webcredible.co.uk/user-friendly-resources/web-accessibility/uk-website-legal-requirements.shtml

To paraphrase the linked page:

The DDA makes it unlawful for a service provider to discriminate against a disabled person by refusing to provide any service that it provides to members of the general public.

I read this to mean that all websites that provide a service to the public are required to be accessible under the terms of the DDA. This would include Government websites, but also home-shopping websites (from, for example, Sainsbury's, Asda, Tesco's, etc) and the Royal Mail or cinema ticket-reservation sites.

From 01/10/1999 service providers must take reasonable steps to change any practice that makes it unreasonably difficult for disabled people to make use of its services

The key term here, I think, is 'reasonable steps.' I presume, from this, that if the website/service generates an income of £10000 per annum, and the cost of compliance with accessibility would be in excess of £10000 then you could argue that it exceeded any reasonable effort/cost to become compliant.

However, this is the reason that progressive enhancement is popular in Javascript and CSS. If the service, at its most basic, is accessible then Javascript and CSS can be used to make it prettier and shinier (whatever that means to you), but it should degrade back to a functional UI when JS or CSS are disabled. In this situation the site is compliant, but a disabled person might not have the same shiny, moving buttons.

Accessibility means that they must be able to access the service/site without unreasonable difficulty. It does not mean that the site has to look/behave exactly the same.

A direct quote from the linked page:

2.13 - 2.17 (p11-13): “What services are affected by the Disability Discrimination Act? An airline company provides a flight reservation and booking service to the public on its website. This is a provision of a service and is subject to the act.”

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Is it only mandatory to make site accessible for Govt. own website and for stock exchange listed corporate sites. or for all type of sites? –  Jitendra Vyas Mar 3 '10 at 16:04
    
“Is it only mandatory to make site accessible for Govt. own website and for stock exchange listed corporate sites. or for all type of sites?” Again, this will vary from country to country. (Are you really expecting us to research web accessibility laws for the whole world? This is why Stack Overflow works better with specific questions.) But in the UK, I believe the Disability Discrimination Act applies to all companies, as compared to America’s Section 508, which I believe applies just to government departments. (Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer.) –  Paul D. Waite Mar 3 '10 at 16:11
    
I don’t think there’s any restriction to companies listed on a stock exchange either. –  Paul D. Waite Mar 3 '10 at 16:12
    
Why i asked this because i've worked for many companies from UK but only Corporate companies worried about standards not others –  Jitendra Vyas Mar 3 '10 at 16:17
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"Yes, particularly the United Kingdom, Ireland and Australia." I think in USA also accessibleweb.us/benefits.htm –  Jitendra Vyas Mar 3 '10 at 17:05
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In addition to above answers: The W3C has a page listing relevant laws in different countries, including links to the relevant laws (often in the language of that country though):

http://www.w3.org/WAI/Policy/

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As I said, it's very hard to answer in general. I guess you will be getting a list of answers specific to countries - maybe a good idea to make it Community Wiki.

For Germany, according to Wikipedia and other sources:

  • Newly built web sites of federal administrative bodies in Germany have to be accessible by law since 2006. The accessibility guidelines are defined in a directive named BITV (german text here). BITV follows the WCAG 1.0 Guidelines very closely.

  • Similar laws exist for the country's sixteen states ("Länder").

  • The creation of accessible web sites is encouraged by a number of government and EU initiatives and private initiatives like the BIENE Award (German only).

  • To my knowledge, no plans to enforce accessibility in non-government websites exist at this time.

As to why countries implement their own guidelines, among other things, language certainly is an issue: To put guidelines into a law, you need the guidelines in your native language, double-checked by lawyers.

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There is an ISO standard, ISO 23026 for reccomended practices for website engineering and website lifecycle management and this does not vary for country specific guidelines. This std includes clauses for website accessibility as well. This standard touches upon guidelines for website accessibility, usability and security, etc.

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Why are there so many accessibility guidelines -- WACG 1, WCAG 2.0, DDA, Section 508, etc.?

Just on this point (and assuming “DDA” refers to the UK’s Disability Discrimination Act), the Act doesn’t contain any guidelines on web accessibility in particular.

It makes a legal requirement for companies to provide equivalent service to disabled and non-disabled customers, and that requirement applies to websites just like any other service.

But the Act doesn’t count as another set of guidelines in itself.

I believe Section 508 was based on, and is almost identical to, WCAG 1.

That just leaves WCAG 1 and 2, both of which are from the W3C, and version 2 now supersedes version 1. So there’s actually just one set of guidelines, unless you’ve got any more examples.

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