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Scenario:

Consider the following abstract class MeasurementType and its subtypes Acceleration and Density:

public abstract class MeasurementType {
  protected String name;
  protected String[] units;

  public MeasurementType() {}

  public MeasurementType(String name) {
    this.name = name;
  }

  protected void setName(String name) {
    this.name = name;
  }

  protected String getName() {
    return name;
  }

  protected void setUnits(String[] values) {
    this.units = values;
  }
}

public class Acceleration extends MeasurementType {
  private String name;

  public Acceleration () {
    super();
  }

  public Acceleration(String name) {
    super();
  }

}

public class Density extends MeasurementType {
  private String name;

  public Density() {
    super();
  }

  public Density(String name) {
    super();
  }

}

Question:

What is the need for the subtypes are since there isn't anything in those classes that differentiates them apart enough (at least in my implementations) to give them the right to exist as their own entities, but for the sake of the example, lets say they had their own arrays containing units for each distinct type, so density would have kilograms, grams etc.. and acceleration would have mph, kmph etc..

Finally I have this run class which I quickly made up:

public class run {

  public run() {}

  public static MeasurementType testType() {
    Acceleration a = new Acceleration("meters per second");
    return (MeasurementType) a;
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    MeasurementType mt = testType();
    System.out.println(mt.getClass().toString());
    System.out.println(mt.getClass().getName());

    String type = "acceleration";
    String[] units = new String[8];

    Object mType;
    if(type.equals("acceleration")) {
      mType = new Acceleration();
    } else if(type.equals("density")) {
      mType = new Density();
    } else {
      mType = new Object();
    }

    System.out.println(mType.getName());
  }
}

This is where i encountered the problem that I was thinking about. I was using strings to determine the type that I would instantiate, but the problem is, by default right at the end of the conditional statements I instantiate Object because otherwise the compiler would complain that the mType variable wouldn't have been initialized. I can't create a MeasurementType object since it is an abstract class.

I guess this is more of a design question, but is there a better way of determining the class to instantiate? Please assume that the String type = "acceleration" came from a drop down or somewhere from some user interface, I have just hard coded it in because it isn't really necessary for the question.

Could someone shed some light on this design fault as I see it please.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Danubian Sailor, Raedwald, Hitham S. AlQadheeb, Aniket Kulkarni, mtrw May 19 '14 at 8:24

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I'm somewhat confused by your first part; you have two identical subclasses but then say you are going to make them unique. At which point it makes sense –  Richard Tingle May 18 '14 at 16:00
3  
I have to wonder if you are using Strings ("acceleration" and "density") in places where an enum would make much more sense. The enum gives your code improved type safety in that it would be impossible to pass an enum into a method parameter that doesn't match one of the enum items -- or null of course. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 18 '14 at 17:23
3  
This question is more suitable for codereview.stackexchange.com, since it's about design style rather than implementation correctness. –  La-comadreja May 18 '14 at 23:39
    
This question is suited for codereview.stackexchange –  Hitham S. AlQadheeb May 19 '14 at 7:25

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

something like this factory-like codes may help. This saves 100 if equals and new Xxxx() statements if you have 100 subTypes.

public abstract class MeasurementType {
    protected  String name;

    private static final Map<String, Class<? extends MeasurementType>> typeMap = new HashMap<>();
    static{
        typeMap.put("accelaration", Acceleration.class);
        typeMap.put("density", Density.class);
       //put here if you have others
    }

    public static MeasurementType getMeasurement(String keyStr) throws RuntimeException {
        if (typeMap.containsKey(keyStr)) {
            try {
                return typeMap.get(keyStr).newInstance();
            }
            catch (Exception e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
                throw new RuntimeException("creation failed.");
            }
        }
            //this could be a speical exception type
        throw new RuntimeException("creation failed: unknown type"); 
    }

}

in your run class/method:

        String s = "accelaration";
        String s2 = "trash";
        MeasurementType t = null;

        try {
            t =MeasurementType.getMeasurement(s);
            t = MeasurementType.getMeasurement(s2); //throw ex
        }catch (RuntimeException e){
            //do something
        }
share|improve this answer
5  
Kind of nitpicking, but RuntimeException is as bad as the catch (Exception) clause. The throw begs for IllegalArgumentException, the catch for a ClassNotFoundException. There are enough pokemon-trainers-turned-developers in the world as is. –  TC1 May 18 '14 at 22:40
3  
Isn't reflection generally considered somewhat scary? –  Simon Kuang May 19 '14 at 3:20
    
Here is a good article contrasting the use of reflection against the more conventional approach in the factory pattern, good read IMO: oodesign.com/factory-pattern.html –  mish May 19 '14 at 7:37
    
I often use something a little like this, but with a Provider interface which provides a new Object on demand and lambdas to make the use of it a little shorter (instead of an annonomous inner class); avoids the reflection and is a little more flexible with differing constructor arguments. cc @SimonKuang –  Richard Tingle May 19 '14 at 7:46

Looking at the crux of your question, what to do when the string is neither "acceleration" or "density".

if(type.equals("acceleration")) {
  mType = new Acceleration();
} else if(type.equals("density")) {
  mType = new Density();
} else {
  mType = new Object();
}

Is this a sign that something in your program has broken, that it is irretrievable wrong? In which case; throw an exception.

if(type.equals("acceleration")) {
  mType = new Acceleration();
} else if(type.equals("density")) {
  mType = new Density();
} else {
  throw new RuntimeException("variable type is not a valid type, valid types are 'acceleration' and 'density'";
}

This is a realisation you will come to; exceptions are your friend. They mean when the program is wrong it screams where and why and then you fix it. On the other hand quietly ignoring the problem leads to subtle bugs and strange behaviour that can take days to diagnose.

On the other hand is this a sign of the user entering inappropriate input? In that case, validate the input and if its invalid tell the end user and ask for it again.

Using Strings and if statements like this is likely not to be what you want to do at all, but under the assumption it is what you want to do then this is the way forward (a switch statement would be slightly nicer).

share|improve this answer

If the string is not one of the reconized measurement type names, you shouldn't create an Object. You should signal the problem by throwing an exception:

public MeasurementType fromString(String type) {
    if (type.equals("acceleration")) {
        return new Acceleration();
    } 
    else if (type.equals("density")) {
        return new Density();
    } 
    else {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(type + " is not a known measurement type");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

one way is to add a DefaultMesurementType subclass to MesurementType subclasses. this also known as Null Object pattern...

another way to bypass compiler error is to simply assign null to mType :

MesurementType mType = null;
if(type.equals("acceleration")) {
    mType = new Acceleration();
} else if(type.equals("density")) {
    mType = new Density();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Lets be honest; I do do this, but it is a dangerous game; you can get NullPointerExceptions far from where the problem actually is –  Richard Tingle May 18 '14 at 16:11
    
@RichardTingle yes, for that i mentioned Null Object Pattern... –  Taher Khorshidi May 18 '14 at 16:12

As for your specific issue, your final else clause should either return null (IMO ugly) or, preferably, throw an Exception.

else {
  throw new IllegalArgumentException(type + " is not a legal type.");
}

Also, be very wary of passing in arrays to a constructor / setter, as the caller still has a reference to it and could modify it. You probably want to make a defensive copy.

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Let's put some shed on design & try to improve it for flexibility & maintainability ...
1) First of all use a design principle "Program to an interface but not an implementation" in the following part of your code.

public static MeasurementType testType() {
    MeasurementType a = new Acceleration("meters per second");
    return a;
  }

2) You can use Factory Pattern to get a correct MeasurementType depending upon the mType provided by the client.

public static MeasurementType testType(String mType) {
        MeasurementType a = MeasurementFactory.getMeasurementType(mType);
        return a;
      }

3) Always keep in mind the most important design principle - "Encapsulate What Varies". Now it's time to extract out the part of the code that may change in future. Make a factory...

public class MeasurementFactory {

    public static MeasurementType getMeasurementType(String mType) {

        if (mType.equals("acceleration")) {
            return new Acceleration();
        } else if (mType.equals("density")) {
            return new Density();
        } else {
            throw new RuntimeException("Invalid MeasurementType");
        }
    }
}

Now, your design is more flexible & better. Every time you add a new MeasurementType, you need to change the MeasurementFactory class rather than cascading down change everywhere.

share|improve this answer
    
This still has the possibility for a 'null` floating around. I'd much prefer an exception since that causes problems at the site of the mistake not a nullpointerException far from the real problem –  Richard Tingle May 18 '14 at 16:43
    
Thanks Richard, I just ignored that while writing code. Generally I return null in the else of Factory & catch the NullPointerException at appropriate place. –  Adarsh Singhal May 18 '14 at 16:52

Yes, you're right. It is a design problem. Always bear in mind that different classes should have different behavior, so only make different classes where it makes sense to make them. Also to answer your problem, you might want to take a look at the strategy design pattern. Yours is a classic problem of software and also has a classic answer. Please check it and try to implement it.

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