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In Linux, a lot of IPC is done by appending to a file in 1 process and reading the new content from another process.

I want to do the above in Windows/.NET (Too messy to use normal IPC such as pipes). I'm appending to a file from a Python process, and I want to read the changes and ONLY the changes each time FileSystemWatcher reports an event. I do not want to read the entire file content into memory each time I'm looking for changes (the file will be huge)

Each append operation appends a row of data that starts with a unique incrementing counter (timestamp+key) and ends with a newline.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted
    using (FileStream fs = new FileStream
       (fileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.ReadWrite))
    {
        using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(fs))
        {
            while (someCondition)
            {
                while (!sr.EndOfStream)
                    ProcessLinr(sr.ReadLine());
                while (sr.EndOfStream)
                    Thread.Sleep(100);
                ProcessLinr(sr.ReadLine());            
            }
        }
    }

this will help you read only appended lines

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Tested, it works. Pretty cool technique. –  Robert Harvey Mar 3 '10 at 17:20

You can store the offset of the last read operation and seek the file to that offset when you get a changed file notification. An example follows:

Main method:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    File.WriteAllLines("test.txt", new string[] { });

    new Thread(() => ReadFromFile()).Start();

    WriteToFile();
}

Read from file method:

private static void ReadFromFile()
{
    long offset = 0;

    FileSystemWatcher fsw = new FileSystemWatcher
    {
        Path = Environment.CurrentDirectory,
        Filter = "test.txt"
    };

    FileStream file = File.Open(
        "test.txt",
        FileMode.Open,
        FileAccess.Read,
        FileShare.Write);

    StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(file);
    while (true)
    {
        fsw.WaitForChanged(WatcherChangeTypes.Changed);

        file.Seek(offset, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        if (!reader.EndOfStream)
        {
            do
            {
                Console.WriteLine(reader.ReadLine());
            } while (!reader.EndOfStream);

            offset = file.Position;
        }
    }
}

Write to file method:

private static void WriteToFile()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        FileStream writeFile = File.Open(
            "test.txt",
            FileMode.Append,
            FileAccess.Write,
            FileShare.Read);

        using (FileStream file = writeFile)
        {
            using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(file))
            {
                sw.WriteLine(i);
                Thread.Sleep(100);
            }
        }
    }
}
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I'm a bit of a noob when it comes to file operations. Does seek load everything into memory or does it only load from offset to offset+length? –  jameszhao00 Mar 3 '10 at 17:49
    
To my knowledge the seek operation will not load any data and just position the file stream at the specified position. In this case the position will be where the new data starts. –  João Angelo Mar 3 '10 at 18:10

i monitor a specific file change detection using FileSystemWatcher class here is my code.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.IO;
using System.Security.Permissions;
using System.Threading;

namespace FileSystemWatcher
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            new Thread(() => Run()).Start();

        }

        [PermissionSet(SecurityAction.Demand, Name = "FullTrust")]
        public static void Run()
        {

            // Create a new FileSystemWatcher and set its properties.
            System.IO.FileSystemWatcher watcher = new System.IO.FileSystemWatcher();
            watcher.Path =@"U:\";
            /* Watch for changes in LastAccess and LastWrite times, and
               the renaming of files or directories. */
            watcher.NotifyFilter = NotifyFilters.LastAccess | NotifyFilters.LastWrite
               | NotifyFilters.FileName | NotifyFilters.DirectoryName;
            // Only watch text files.
            watcher.Filter = "PSS0219.TXT";

            // Add event handlers.
            watcher.Changed += new FileSystemEventHandler(OnChanged);

            // Begin watching.
            watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = true;

            // Wait for the user to quit the program.
            Console.WriteLine("Press \'q\' to quit the sample.");
            while (Console.Read() != 'q') ;
        }

        // Define the event handlers.
        private static void OnChanged(object source, FileSystemEventArgs e)
        {
            // Specify what is done when a file is changed, created, or deleted.
            MessageBox.Show("File: " + e.FullPath + " " + e.ChangeType);
        }

    }
}
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