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Here is the snippet of my code:

var  main = function(){
    this.f = function(){
        console.log ( "nothing much");
    }
};

main.prototype.fun = function(){
    console.log ( "I am Fun");
    /*
      1st Here this will refer to Object of `main`. 
      But I want someway to bind f1 to fun not to main
    */
    this.f1 = function(){
        console.log ( "Help!");   
        return this;
    };

    this.f2 = function(){
        console.log ( "Print");
        return this;
    };

    /*
      2nd. Here again this will refer to Object of `main`. 
      But I want to return object of fun.
    */
    return this;
}

Now, I can achieve 1st point via following code, but that seems very long way ( 2nd problem is still there ):

main.prototype.fun.prototype.f1 = function(){
    console.log ( "Help FUN");
    return this;
};

main.prototype.fun.prototype.f2 = function(){
    console.log ( "Print FUN");
    return this;
};

How do you guys handle this scenario?

share|improve this question
    
So you intend main.prototype.fun to be used as a constructor, like var m = new main(); var f = new main.fun(); f.f1();? I don't understand why you'd do that. Otherwise there is no fun object other than the function object. –  cookie monster May 19 '14 at 7:49
    
Maybe to concatenate actions? main.fun().f1().f2() –  Patrick Hofman May 19 '14 at 7:50
    
@PatrickHofman: But there's no distinct fun object there other than the function itself. That can certainly be done, but it doesn't fit with what he's describing. –  cookie monster May 19 '14 at 7:51
1  
@RakeshJuyal: You can do that with your existing code. So what's the issue? jsfiddle.net/7h32c –  cookie monster May 19 '14 at 7:53
1  
I think you'll be better off just editing your question to explain your situation more thoroughly. –  cookie monster May 19 '14 at 7:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could have 2 different class like functions here:

var Fun = function(){ };

Fun.prototype.f1 = function(){
  console.log ( "Help FUN");
  return this;
};
Fun.prototype.f2 = function(){
  console.log ( "Print FUN");
  return this;
};

Then define a property of Fun in your Main:

var Main = function(){ };
Main.prototype.fun = new Fun();

or like:

var Main = function(){
  this.fun = new Fun();
};

Then you can use it like:

var main = new Main();

main.fun.f1().f2();

or

main.fun.f2().f1();
share|improve this answer

In this scenario, you can use arguments.callee;

var  main = function(){
    this.f = function(){
        console.log ( "nothing much");
    }
};
main.prototype.fun = function(){
    console.log ( "I am Fun");
    var scope=arguments.callee;
    scope.f1 = function(){
        console.log ( "Help FUN");
        return scope;
    };
    scope.f2 = function(){
        console.log ( "Print FUN");
        return scope;
    };
    return scope;
}

// test it
var test1=new main();
test1.f();
var test2=test1.fun();
test2.f1();
test2.f2();

Or,

var  main = function(){
    this.f = function(){
        console.log ( "nothing much");
    }
};
var fun=main.prototype.fun = function(){
    console.log ( "I am Fun");
    fun.f1 = function(){
        console.log ( "Help FUN");
        return fun;
    };
    fun.f2 = function(){
        console.log ( "Print FUN");
        return fun;
    };
    return fun;
}

// test it
var test1=new main();
test1.f();
var test2=test1.fun();
test2.f1();
test2.f2();
share|improve this answer
    
That just refers to the fun function. If he wanted to do that, he wouldn't need arguments.callee or a variable. He could just use this.fun. –  cookie monster May 19 '14 at 8:10
    
using arguments.callee is not allowed in 'use strict' mode, so be careful about it. there is an alternative for it in ES5, using function names in the scope of the function, check this link out for more information. –  Mehran Hatami May 19 '14 at 8:15

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