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I'm trying to create a module with a method that receives a subroutine and redefines it. I had no problem redefining a subroutine inside the main script but the same syntax doesn't seem to work inside the method:

main.pl

use strict;
use warnings;
use ReDef;

sub orig{
    print "Original!\n";
}
orig;
*orig=sub{print "not Original!\n";};
orig;
ReDef::redef(\&orig);
orig;

ReDef.pm

package ReDef;

use strict;
use warnings;

sub redef {
    my $ref=shift;
    *ref = sub {print "Redefined!";} 
}

1;

Test output:

perl main.pl
Original!
Subroutine main::orig redefined at main.pl line 9.
not Original!
not Original!

ReDef::redef() doesn't redefine. The way I see it, the *ref is a coderef and assigning to it another subroutine should change main::orig();

What is the correct syntax?

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2 Answers 2

Your redef function should be like this:

package ReDef;
use strict;
use warnings;
sub redef {
   my $ref = shift;
   no warnings qw(redefine);
   *$ref = sub { print "Redefined!" };
}

And you should NOT call it like this:

ReDef::redef(\&orig);

Instead, you must call it like this:

ReDef::redef(\*orig);

Why? When you call orig, you're looking up the name "orig" via the symbol table, so the redef function needs to be altering the symbol table, so that it can point that name to a different bit of code. Globrefs are basically pointers to little bits of symbol table, so that's what you need to pass to ReDef::redef.

As an analogy, imagine that when you want to know the date of the Battle of Lewes, your procedure is to go to the library, look in the catalogue for the shelf address of a book on 13th century English battles, go to that shelf, and look up the date... voila 14 May 1264! Now, imagine I want to feed you altered information. Simply defining a new coderef would be like putting a new book on the shelf: it won't trick you because the catalogue is still pointing you at the old book. We need to alter the catalogue too.

UPDATE

You can make this a little prettier using prototypes. Prototypes are not usually recommended, but this seems to be a non-evil use for them...

use strict;
use warnings;

sub ReDef::redef (*) {
   my $ref = shift;
   no warnings qw(redefine);
   *$ref = sub { print "Redefined!\n" };
}

sub orig { print "Original!\n" }
orig;

ReDef::redef *orig;  # don't need the backslash any more
orig;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! If I understand things correctly, your solution changes the symbol table so that orig’s record in the symbol table gets changed to something inside ReDef. Whereas my solution keeps a plain coderef in main:: and it’s the coderef’s value, not its symbol table record, that changes. –  zoul May 19 '14 at 10:17
    
zoul, yes, in your solution the variable $orig gets given a new value, which is fine, but the asker doesn't seem to be keeping his code in references, but in the symbol table (which is a perfectly normal thing to do!). –  tobyink May 19 '14 at 10:21
    
You're right, this seems to be better fit for what was trying to do. Now, if I alter the redef subroutine to call the original one before the redefinition like this: ${$ref}->(), it appears to work as intended, dereferencing the reference to the subroutine. Is that the appropriate way? –  Worse_Username May 19 '14 at 10:38
    
I've noticed a possible side-effect: when I print the de-parsed code of the redefined subroutine using Data::Dumper, the ReDef package declaration, as well as use statements appear in the beginning. Is it a side-effect of declaring the anonymous subroutine inside the module? If I intend to redefine a subroutine from another module that itself uses some other modules, could this present trouble? –  Worse_Username May 19 '14 at 11:11
    
B::Deparse (the module which Data::Dumper uses to deparse coderefs) will often print a package declaration and various pragmas in the output. This is so that "caller" information and compile-time hints are correct within the function. Don't let it bother you - B::Deparse is doing the right thing. –  tobyink May 19 '14 at 13:35

This works for me:

use v5.16;
use strict;
use warnings;

package Redef;

sub redef {
    my $ref = shift;
    ${$ref} = sub { say "Redefined!"; }
}

package main;

my $orig = sub { say "Original!"; };
Redef::redef(\$orig);
$orig->(); # Redefined!

Although it’s just a result of trial and error, I’d be happy to see better answers.

What maybe got you confused is the typeglob operator, *. In Perl you dereference using a sigil (${$scalar_ref}, @{$array_ref}) and the * operator is used for symbol table tricks – which could also be used in your case, see the answer by @tobyink.

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Thanks, this appears to work for me as well. But what is ${$ref} exactly? –  Worse_Username May 19 '14 at 9:31
    
${$ref} is just dereferencing the reference $ref. But you have to notice, that zoul was not defining a subroutine like you did but a subroutine reference by using $orig = sub { ... } –  user3112922 May 19 '14 at 9:55
    
$ref evaluates to a reference (to a code reference), $$ref (= ${$ref}) evaluates to a code reference. Which means that $ is a dereference operator here, if I’m not mistaken. –  zoul May 19 '14 at 9:57

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