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I have the following statement:

SELECT DISTINCT COUNT(Z.TITLE) AS COUNT 
FROM QMFILES.MPRLRREQDP Y, 
     QMFILES.MPRLRTYPP Z
WHERE Y.REQUEST_TYPE = Z.ID 
  AND Y.REQUEST_ID = 13033;

On this particular result set, if I removed DISTINCT and COUNT() the result set will return nine rows of the exact same data. If I add DISTINCT, I get one row. Adding COUNT() I get a result of nine where I am expecting one. I am assuming the order of operations are affecting my result, but how can I fix this so I get the result I want?

NOTE: This is a subselect within a larger SQL statement.

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2  
I think COUNT(DISTINCT Z.TITLE) would have done what you wanted. –  shawnt00 May 15 at 23:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

SELECT DISTINCT COUNT(Z.TITLE) counts the number of rows with a value for Z.TITLE (nine). The DISTINCT is superfluous, since the COUNT has already aggregated the rows.

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT Z.TITLE) counts the number of distinct values in Z.TITLE (one).

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I didn't know you could do that. I'll try it in the morning. –  Mike Wills May 15 at 21:24

The COUNT results in one new record which contains the number of items in the SELECT statement. DISTINCT is looking for the results of the COUNT, which is only that single record after all.

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If you actually want the title then it should be

SELECT Z.Title, COUNT(Z.TITLE) AS COUNT 
FROM QMFILES.MPRLRREQDP Y, 
    QMFILES.MPRLRTYPP Z
WHERE Y.REQUEST_TYPE = Z.ID 
    AND Y.REQUEST_ID = 13033
GROUP BY Z.Title;

That will give you something like

"Title 1", 9

or if you have multiple titles

"Title 1", 6
"Title 2", 2
"Title 3", 1

with the number being the count of that distinct title.

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As I said, this was part of a larger SQL statement. That was just one of the sub selects. I marked the answer to my question. –  Mike Wills May 16 at 14:17

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