Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've heard that using gtest we should test all public methods of testing class. But what about setter method which change value of private/protected? How should I test it? Example below.

class Formatter
{
public:
    Formatter();
    void setFormat(std::string format)
    {
         formatPattern = format;
    }
    std::string format(ExampleObject objectToFormat)
    {
         //do something with objectToFormat using protected formatPattern
         //and put output to std::string retval
         return retval;
    }

protected:
    std::string formatPattern;
};

EDIT: format() method added.

share|improve this question
    
you call get, check the value, then you call set and another time get and compare those values. If the value has changed like you expected it works. – Theolodis May 19 '14 at 10:50
    
But what if (just like in my example) I don't have getter method? – Nowax May 19 '14 at 10:58
    
you just write one? I mean what's the purpose of an internal private variable if you don't use it anyways? And if you do use it it would probably change some result so you could check if the expected changes happened. – Theolodis May 19 '14 at 11:09
    
Made edit to show what I try to say. Now I don't need any 'get' method (according to 'tell dont't ask' rule). Format() method is easy to test, but it should be tested after setFormat() method, because it uses setFormat() result. So how can I check setFormat() in this situation? – Nowax May 19 '14 at 11:59
    
Well, if you test without using setFormat and one time after using setFormat you will have tested all possible cases and both methods. – Theolodis May 19 '14 at 12:03

You test the effect that setting the private/protected variable would have. For example:

std::ostringstream a, b;
a << 32;
ASSERT_EQ(a.str(),"32");
b << std::hex() << 32;
ASSERT_EQ(b.str(),"20");

In this example, 'std::hex()' sets some internal formatting for the ostringstream, which you can see in the .str() output.

share|improve this answer
    
In your example you use getter method (str()) and in my example (also in my problem) I haven't one. – Nowax May 19 '14 at 12:02
    
@user3148625 In your case, you would check the result of your invocation of format. (e.g., call setFormat, call format, and then make sure the result corresponds with the value specified earlier in setFormat.) – Lilshieste May 19 '14 at 13:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I found answer for my problem. Before test I create new class which is inherited from formatter. Then, in this class, I implement getter method necessary to test my public setter method in parental class.

namespace consts {
    std::string simpleFormatPattern = "@name @severity @message";
    std::string formatterOutput  = "error ERROR Here is some message";
    LogEntry logEntry("error","Here is some message", ERROR);
} //namespace consts

class ut_formatter : public Formatter
{
public: 
    ut_formatter()
    {}
    ~ut_formatter()
    {}

    std::string getFormatPattern(void)
    {
        return formatPattern;
    }
};

TEST(ut_formatter, SetFormatOk) 
{
    ut_formatter formatter;
    formatter.setFormat(consts::simpleFormatPattern);

    ASSERT_EQ(consts::simpleFormatPattern, formatter.getFormatPattern());
}

TEST(ut_formatter, FormatOk) 
{
    ut_formatter formatter;
    formatter.setFormat(consts::simpleFormatPattern);

    ASSERT_EQ(consts::formatterOutput, formatter.format(consts::logEntry));
}
share|improve this answer

There is much to be said for the view that you shouldn't unit-test the internals of an API, just the public behaviour. If you decide to do it anyway, the googletest way us to use the macro:

FRIEND_TEST(TestCaseName, TestName)

which is defined in the header gtest/gtest_prod.h.

Here's an example test runner that applies this to your class Formatter:

Formatter.h

#include "gtest/gtest_prod.h"
#include <string>

class Formatter
{
    FRIEND_TEST(t_Formatter_setFormat, t_formatPatternSetCorrect);
public:
    Formatter(){};
    void setFormat(std::string format)
    {
         formatPattern = format;
    }
    // Methods, methods...

protected:
    std::string formatPattern;
};

test runner

#include "Formatter.h"
#include "gtest/gtest.h"
#include <string>

TEST(t_Formatter_setFormat, t_formatPatternSetCorrect) {
    Formatter f;
    f.setFormat("A%Format%Pattern");
    EXPECT_EQ(f.formatPattern,"A%Format%Pattern");
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    ::testing::InitGoogleTest(&argc, argv);
    return RUN_ALL_TESTS();
}

As you would guess,

FRIEND_TEST(t_Formatter_setFormat, t_formatPatternSetCorrect);

just makes the test a friend of class Formatter, so it can access protected and private members.

You see here that the solution is intrusive in the sense that you need to include gtest_prod.h in Formatter.h. But gtest_prod.h itself carries no baggage - here's the code so you can include this header in the distribution of your software without incurring any dependencies. No need to bundle googletest as a whole into your distribution.

Further reading

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.