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How I can rewrite this function to vectorized variant. As I know, using loops are not good practice in R:

# replaces rows that contains all NAs with non-NA values from previous row and K-th column
na.replace <- function(x, k) {
    for (i in 2:nrow(x)) {
        if (!all(is.na(x[i - 1, ])) && all(is.na(x[i, ]))) {
                x[i, ] <- x[i - 1, k]
        }
    }
    x
}

This is input data and returned data for function:

m <- cbind(c(NA,NA,1,2,NA,NA,NA,6,7,8), c(NA,NA,2,3,NA,NA,NA,7,8,9))
m
      [,1] [,2]
 [1,]   NA   NA
 [2,]   NA   NA
 [3,]    1    2
 [4,]    2    3
 [5,]   NA   NA
 [6,]   NA   NA
 [7,]   NA   NA
 [8,]    6    7
 [9,]    7    8
[10,]    8    9

na.replace(m, 2)
      [,1] [,2]
 [1,]   NA   NA
 [2,]   NA   NA
 [3,]    1    2
 [4,]    2    3
 [5,]    3    3
 [6,]    3    3
 [7,]    3    3
 [8,]    6    7
 [9,]    7    8
[10,]    8    9
share|improve this question
    
Could you please state exactly what it is you're trying to achieve? –  Richard Scriven May 19 '14 at 17:08
    
I want to use vectorized solution that do the same algorithm as function above. Algorithm is simple: replace all NA rows with values from previous rows and K-th column. –  Eldar Agalarov May 19 '14 at 17:11
2  
Have you checked out na.locf in the zoo package? –  maloneypatr May 19 '14 at 17:20
    
If I'm not mistaken, na.locf doesn't work for entire rows. –  Señor O May 19 '14 at 17:24
1  
Notice that, unless you have a pathological condition where the first row is all NA (in which case you're screwed anyway), you don't need to check whether all(is.na(x[i - 1, ])) is T or F because in the previous time thru the loop you "fixed" row i-1 . –  Carl Witthoft May 19 '14 at 19:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is a solution using na.locf in the zoo package. row.na is a vector with one component per row of m such that a component is TRUE if the corresponding row of m is all NA and FALSE otherwise. We then set all elements of such rows to the result of applying na.locf to column 2.

At the expense of a bit of speed the lines ending with ## could be replaced with row.na <- apply(is.na(m), 1, all) which is a bit more readable.

If we knew that if any row has an NA in column 2 then all columns of that row are NA, as in the question, then the lines ending in ## could be reduced to just row.na <- is.na(m[, 2])

library(zoo)

nr <- nrow(m) ##
nc <- ncol(m) ##

row.na <- .rowSums(is.na(m), nr, nc) == nc ##

m[row.na, ] <- na.locf(m[, 2], na.rm = FALSE)[row.na]

The result is:

> m
      [,1] [,2]
 [1,]   NA   NA
 [2,]   NA   NA
 [3,]    1    2
 [4,]    2    3
 [5,]    3    3
 [6,]    3    3
 [7,]    3    3
 [8,]    6    7
 [9,]    7    8
[10,]    8    9

REVISED Some revisions to improve speed as in comments below. Also added alternatives in discussion.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Seems your solution can be more efficient: row.na <- apply(m, 1, function(x) all(is.na(x))) m[row.na, ] <- na.locf(m[, 2], na.rm = F)[row.na] –  Eldar Agalarov May 20 '14 at 21:07
1  
I would expect putting the m[,2] in na.locf would be faster but the apply in the answer should be faster because is.na is only called once rather than once per column. I have tested the various combinations and modified the answer to the fastest I found. –  G. Grothendieck May 20 '14 at 21:36
1  
if you are concerned about speed, then do rowSums(is.na(m)) == ncol(m) rather than apply(is.na(m), 1, all). –  flodel May 20 '14 at 23:11
    
Good point. row.na <- .rowSums(is.na(m), nrow(m), ncol(m)) == ncol(m) is faster still. –  G. Grothendieck May 20 '14 at 23:40

Notice that, unless you have a pathological condition where the first row is all NANA (in which case you're screwed anyway), you don't need to check whether all(is.na(x[i−1,]))all(is.na(x[i - 1, ])) is T or F because in the previous time thru the loop you "fixed" row i−1i-1 .
Further, all you care about is that the designated k-th value is not NA. The rest of the row doesn't matter.

BUT: The k-th value always "falls through" from the top, so perhaps you should:

1) treat the k-th column as a vector, e.g. c(NA,1,NA,NA,3,NA,4,NA,NA) and "fill-down" all numeric values. That's been done many times on SO questions.

2) Every row which is entirely NA except for column k gets filled with that same value. I think that's still best done using either a loop or apply

You probably need to clarify whether some rows have both numeric and NA values, which your example fails to include. If that's the case, then things get trickier.

share|improve this answer
    
Rows can contain only all NAs or only all numeric values. Thank You for idea, I realized now vectorized solution and it works fine. I posted it as answer. –  Eldar Agalarov May 20 '14 at 1:17

The most important part in this answer is getting the grouping you want, which is:

groups = cumsum(rowSums(is.na(m)) != ncol(m))
groups
#[1] 0 0 1 2 2 2 2 3 4 5

Once you have that the rest is just doing your desired operation by group, e.g.:

library(data.table)

dt = as.data.table(m)

k = 2
cond = rowSums(is.na(m)) != ncol(m)
dt[, (k) := .SD[[k]][1], by = cumsum(cond)]
dt[!cond, names(dt) := .SD[[k]]]
dt
#    V1 V2
# 1: NA NA
# 2: NA NA
# 3:  1  2
# 4:  2  3
# 5:  3  3
# 6:  3  3
# 7:  3  3
# 8:  6  7
# 9:  7  8
#10:  8  9
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, but your solution looks heavyweight and using third-party package. –  Eldar Agalarov May 20 '14 at 1:15
1  
I suspect it is heavyweight, but the base-only restriction is a handicap you should not impose on yourself without extremely good reasons. R wouldn't be what it is without third-party packages. I'm curious if you have any real-size examples to play around with? –  eddi May 20 '14 at 2:54
1  
@EldarAgalarov I modified the solution to be more modular and simpler –  eddi May 20 '14 at 3:07
    
Thanks, your solution returns correct output. I never used "data.table" package so I have troubles with reading and understanding of your code :) For me is better to use base-only structures as much as possible. –  Eldar Agalarov May 20 '14 at 3:16
3  
If you're using R for any "big data (frames)", data.table is a critical package worth knowing in depth. IMO, data.table should be part of 'base R' –  FXQuantTrader May 20 '14 at 19:10

Here is another base only vectorized approach:

na.replace <- function(x, k) {
   is.all.na <- rowSums(is.na(x)) == ncol(x)
   ref.idx <- cummax((!is.all.na) * seq_len(nrow(x)))
   ref.idx[ref.idx == 0] <- NA
   x[is.all.na, ] <- x[ref.idx[is.all.na], k]
   x
}

And for fair comparison with @Eldar's solution, replace is.all.na with is.all.na <- is.na(x[, k]).

share|improve this answer
    
Also nice and clear solution :) –  Eldar Agalarov May 20 '14 at 2:34

Finally I realized my version of vectorized solution and it works as expected. Any comments and suggestions are welcome :)

# Last Observation Move Forward
# works as na.locf but much faster and accepts only 1D structures
na.lomf <- function(object, na.rm = F) {
    idx <- which(!is.na(object))
    if (!na.rm && is.na(object[1])) idx <- c(1, idx)
    rep.int(object[idx], diff(c(idx, length(object) + 1)))
}    

na.replace <- function(x, k) {
    v <- x[, k]
    i <- which(is.na(v))
    r <- na.lomf(v)
    x[i, ] <- r[i]
    x
}
share|improve this answer

Here's a workaround with the na.locf function from zoo:

m[na.locf(ifelse(apply(m, 1, function(x) all(is.na(x))), NA, 1:nrow(m)), na.rm=F),]

      [,1] [,2]
 [1,]   NA   NA
 [2,]   NA   NA
 [3,]    1    2
 [4,]    2    3
 [5,]    2    3
 [6,]    2    3
 [7,]    2    3
 [8,]    6    7
 [9,]    7    8
[10,]    8    9
share|improve this answer
2  
Your variant returns wrong result. Rows 5,6,7 must be (3, 3) but not (2, 3). –  Eldar Agalarov May 19 '14 at 17:37

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