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I have a problem with using a pointer to function in C++. Here is my example:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class bar
{
public:
    void (*funcP)();
};

class foo
{
public:
    bar myBar;
    void hello(){cout << "hello" << endl;};
};

void byebye()
{
    cout << "bye" << endl;
}


int main()
{
    foo testFoo;

    testFoo.myBar.funcP = &byebye;         //OK
    testFoo.myBar.funcP = &testFoo.hello;  //ERROR
    return 0;
}

Compilator returns an error at testFoo.myBar.funcP = &testFoo.hello;:

ISO C++ forbids taking the address of a bound member function to form a pointer to member function. Say '&foo::hello'

cannot convert 'void (foo::)()' to 'void ()()' in assignment

So i tried it like this:

class bar
{
public:
    void (*foo::funcP)();
};

But now the compilator adds one more:

'foo' has not been declared

Is there a way make it work?

Thanks in advance for suggestions

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Taking everyone's suggestions together, your final solution will look like:

#include <iostream> 
using std::cout;
usind std::endl;

class foo; // tell the compiler there's a foo out there.

class bar 
{ 
public: 
    // If you want to store a pointer to each type of function you'll
    // need two different pointers here:
    void (*freeFunctionPointer)();
    void (foo::*memberFunctionPointer)();
}; 

class foo 
{ 
public: 
    bar myBar; 
    void hello(){ cout << "hello" << endl; }
}; 

void byebye() 
{ 
    cout << "bye" << endl; 
} 


int main() 
{ 
    foo testFoo; 

    testFoo.myBar.freeFunctionPointer = &byebye;
    testFoo.myBar.memberFunctionPointer = &foo::hello;

    ((testFoo).*(testFoo.myBar.memberFunctionPointer))(); // calls foo::hello()
    testFoo.myBar.freeFunctionPointer();   // calls byebye()
    return 0; 
} 

The C++ FAQ Lite has some guidance on how to simplify the syntax.

Taking Chris' idea and running with it, you could get yourself something like this:

#include <iostream>
using std::cout; using std::endl;

class foo;
typedef void (*FreeFn)();
typedef void (foo::*MemberFn)();

class bar
{
public:
  bar() : freeFn(NULL), memberFn(NULL) {}
  void operator()(foo* other)
  {
    if (freeFn != NULL) { freeFn(); }
    else if (memberFn != NULL) { ((other)->*(memberFn))(); }
    else { cout << "No function attached!" << endl; }
  }

  void setFreeFn(FreeFn value) { freeFn = value; memberFn = NULL; }
  void setMemberFn(MemberFn value) { memberFn = value; freeFn = NULL; }
private:
  FreeFn freeFn;
  MemberFn memberFn;
};

class foo
{
public:
  bar myBar;
  void hello() { cout << "foo::hello()" << endl; }
  void operator()() { myBar(this); }
};

void bye() { cout << "bye()" << endl; }

int main()
{
  foo testFoo;

  testFoo();

  testFoo.myBar.setMemberFn(&foo::hello);
  testFoo();

  testFoo.myBar.setFreeFn(&bye);
  testFoo();

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, but how to run the function that memberFunctionPointer points at? testFoo.myBar.*memberFuncionPointer() results error – Moomin Mar 3 '10 at 21:23
    
@moomin: I added a correct sample of calling the functions this time. – Bill Mar 3 '10 at 21:33
    
Just for completeness, you might want to add a default constructor to bar to set both pointers to 0. You could set up the class so that it always only has one member set (i.e. setting one member 0s the other) and then add an operator() function that calls the set member. Though it'll be more complicated than that in the end. – Chris Lutz Mar 3 '10 at 21:40
    
@Chris: Neat idea. See my edit. – Bill Mar 3 '10 at 22:20

As the error says, methods belong to the class, not to individual instances. For this reason pointers to free functions and pointers to non-static methods are completely different things. You'll also need an instance to call the method on.

//declaring and taking the address of a foo's method 
void (foo::*method)() = &foo::hello; //as the compiler nicely suggests

//calling a function through pointer
free_func();

//calling a method through pointer
foo instance;
(instance.*method)();

You can use libraries like Boost.Bind and Boost.Function (also in std::tr1 I think) to abstract away the difference and also bind an instance to the method:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/function.hpp>

using namespace std;

class foo
{
public:
    void hello(){cout << "hello" << endl;};
};

void byebye()
{
    cout << "bye" << endl;
}


int main()
{
    foo testFoo;

    boost::function<void()> helloFunc(boost::bind(&foo::hello, testFoo));
    boost::function<void()> byeFunc(byebye);

    helloFunc();
    byeFunc();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could please explain how to run the "hello()" from testFoo.myBar? I did 'testFoo.myBar.funcP = &foo::hello;' but '(testFoo.myBar.*funcP)();' returns 'funcP was not declared...' during compilation – Moomin Mar 3 '10 at 21:17

To make your second option work, declare foo so the compiler knows that it is a class.

Also note that your function pointer syntax is incorrect. The * comes just before the name of the variable:

class foo;

class bar
{
public:
    void (foo::*funcP)();
};
share|improve this answer

forward foo's declaration in front of bar:

class foo;
share|improve this answer

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