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I'm trying to build a function so that, given a wind heading, I can get wind direction relative to direction of travel. I've provided an example of doing it the long way. It feels bloated and rudimentary.

I'm having trouble because wind is vector based and I need to find a way to evaluate the function while taking the 360deg circle into account.

def relative_wind(wind_heading, rider_heading):

    if 320 < wind_heading < 60:
        wind_direction = 'north'
    elif 140 > wind_heading > 60:
        wind_direction = 'east'
    elif 230 > wind_heading > 140:
        wind_direction = 'south'
    else:
        wind_direction = 'west'

    if 320 < rider_heading < 60:
        rider_direction = 'north'
    elif 140 > rider_heading > 60:
        rider_direction = 'east'
    elif 230 > rider_heading > 140:
        rider_direction = 'south'
    else:
        rider_direction = 'west'

    if rider_direction == 'north':

        if wind_direction == 'north':
            relative_direction = 'tail'
        elif wind_direction == 'east':
            relative_direction = 'right'
        elif wind_direction == 'south':
            relative_direction = 'head'
        else:
            relative_direction = 'left'
        return relative_direction

    elif rider_direction == 'east':

        if wind_direction == 'north':
            relative_direction = 'left'
        elif wind_direction == 'east':
            relative_direction = 'tail'
        elif wind_direction == 'south':
            relative_direction = 'right'
        else:
            relative_direction = 'head'
        return relative_direction

    elif rider_direction == 'west':

        if wind_direction == 'north':
            relative_direction = 'right'
        elif wind_direction == 'east':
            relative_direction = 'head'
        elif wind_direction == 'south':
            relative_direction = 'left'
        else:
            relative_direction = 'tail'
        return relative_direction

    else:

        if wind_direction == 'north':
            relative_direction = 'head'
        elif wind_direction == 'east':
            relative_direction = 'left'
        elif wind_direction == 'south':
            relative_direction = 'tail'
        else:
            relative_direction = 'right'
        return relative_direction

print relative_wind(285, 285)
share|improve this question
    
And what's wrong with your method? Or are you looking for a more concise way to do this? –  Cyber May 20 '14 at 0:33
    
I'm looking for a way to do it for any direction of travel. For example, if it was 100deg, this would be wrong. –  Will Luce May 20 '14 at 0:35
    
Don't you need two parameters then? Wind heading and direction of travel? –  Cyber May 20 '14 at 0:36
    
Yes, the finished function will be passed two variables. But, doing by hand (like the example) doesn't call for it. –  Will Luce May 20 '14 at 1:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. Your chosen angles are kind of strange:

    enter image description here

    It's probably a good idea to start by sketching out what your angles should actually look like; axis-centered quadrant boundaries would be at 45, 135, 225, and 315 degrees.

  2. Rather than using a hard-coded heading, I suggest you make a function that takes your heading and wind direction and returns relative wind direction:

    def relative_wind_direction(heading, wind_dir):
        """
        Return wind direction relative to plane heading, in [-180..180) degrees
        """
        return ((wind_dir - heading + 180) % 360) - 180
    

    As suggested by @sjy, this uses the % mod operator to fix the result in the desired range.

  3. You can now write a function like

    def wind_aspect(heading, wind_dir):
        rel_dir = relative_wind_direction(heading, wind_dir)
    
        if rel_dir < -135:
            return "head"
        elif rel_dir < -45:
            return "right"
        elif rel_dir < 45:
            return "tail"
        elif rel_dir < 135:
            return "left"
        else:
            return "head"
    
share|improve this answer
1  
Is that not opposite? print wind_aspect(285, 285) returns "head" –  Will Luce May 20 '14 at 3:06
    
@WillLuce: yes, thank you, I was thinking of wind_dir as "coming from" when it should have been "going to". Fixed now. –  Hugh Bothwell May 20 '14 at 12:31

You need to find the difference between the directions mod 360. In Python, use the % operator.

diff = (angle1 - angle2) % 360 # (0 - 45) % 360 = 315
share|improve this answer
    
And how does that get me to left, right, head, and tail? –  Will Luce May 20 '14 at 1:50

Consider: How is it that when travel_heading is 300deg, wind_heading between 240~320 is "head"?

Consider: How is it that when travel_heading is 300deg, wind_heading between 60~320 is "right"?

etc...

Your degree boundaries clearly depend on the travel_heading. You will need to define the boundaries at the beginning of the function before you test for relative heading, for example:

wind_head_boundaries = [travel_heading - 60, travel_heading + 20] # [240, 320]

If travel_heading 300, then you need to calculate the two degree boundaries for "head", according to your example. Of course, this means you will need to pass in the direction of travel as well.

(btw I'm using ruby syntax, as I'm more familiar with it than python, sorry about that)

edit

It also seems you're unfamiliar with how to do computations with angles.

First you'll need the modulo operation. It will allow you to convert all angles to a number between 0 and 359, e.g. 360 degrees is equivalent to 0, and -10 degrees is equivalent to 350 degrees.

Next, you'll have to figure out how to determine "to the right" from "to the left" of a particular angle:

  • With 0 degrees, 1-179 is "to the right" and 181-359 is "to the left"
  • with 15 degrees, 16-194 is "to the right" and 196-374 is "to the left" (look! an angle > 360!)
  • etc...

You'll notice this is a pretty similar problem to the wind_head_boundaries example in the first part of my answer.

share|improve this answer
    
I fixed the example to be correct, but your solution is flawed. Because wind direction is vector based, 359 and 0 are essentially the same direction; which is why I'm having trouble writing the function. –  Will Luce May 20 '14 at 1:07
    
I never intended it to be a solution. It was just an example to demonstrate that you need to compute the boundaries of wind heading off of the travel heading. 359 and 0 aren't the same direction, they are one degree apart. However, 360 and 0 are the same direction. Look up the modulo operation, it will be useful to you. –  Kache May 20 '14 at 3:50
    
@WillLuce updated my answer a little bit to give some more direction –  Kache May 20 '14 at 4:01

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