Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm dealing with unicode stuff in my DB. I have a data field defined as varchar(max), and I'm preventing user to save unknown characters in this field, like "≤" for example (all unicode above U+00FF). While doing so, I found that some characters if sent to be saved in this field would be displayed as "?", so I thought that all unicode characters above "U+00FF" will all be displayed like this, but then I found that "U+201B" which is "‛" is displayed "?" but the next character "U+201C" which is "“" is displayed as "“". Can someone please explain to me why is that?

Update: Sorry if I was not clear, but I do not want to convert to nvarchar, I want to keep my field as varchar. What I need to understand is why a character like "‛" is displayed as "?" in a "varchar" field while the next unicode character "“" is displayed properly?

share|improve this question
    
Please read my updated question, sorry about the misunderstanding. – Saleem May 20 '14 at 8:31
    
What do you mean by "displayed"? In what application? – DavidG May 20 '14 at 8:40
    
in the sql server, if I see it in the table or I select and print it. Why sql server does not display it right while a higher unicode can be displayed?! – Saleem May 20 '14 at 8:43
    
Perhaps it's using UTF-8 encoding? – DavidG May 20 '14 at 8:50
    
Yes I think so, but I hoped I'd know how it can do that with a character and not with another one! – Saleem May 20 '14 at 8:51

If you want to store Unicode characters, you should use an nvarchar type, not varchar

share|improve this answer
    
Please read my updated question, sorry about the misunderstanding. – Saleem May 20 '14 at 8:30
    
And please remove that it's duplicated so I can get more answers :S – Saleem May 20 '14 at 8:32

You need to change your data type to nvarchar which will hold any unicode character where varchar is restricted to 8bit codepage.

For more information, read the accepted answer in this link below.

Difference between varchar and nvarchar

share|improve this answer
    
Please read my updated question, sorry about the misunderstanding. – Saleem May 20 '14 at 8:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.