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It seems to me the fastest way to do a row/col subset of a data.table is to use the join and nomatch option.

Is this correct?

DT = data.table(rep(1:100, 100000), rep(1:10, 1000000))
setkey(DT, V1, V2)
system.time(DT[J(22,2), nomatch=0L])
# user  system elapsed 
# 0.00    0.00    0.01 
system.time(subset(DT, (V1==22) & (V2==2)))
# user  system elapsed 
# 0.45    0.21    0.67 

identical(DT[J(22,2), nomatch=0L],subset(DT, (V1==22) & (V2==2)))
# [1] TRUE

I also have one problem with the fast join based on binary search: I cannot find a way to select all items in one dimension.

Say if I want to subsequently do:

DT[J(22,2), nomatch=0]  # subset on TWO dimensions
DT[J(22,), nomatch=0]   # subset on ONE dimension only
# Error in list(22, ) : argument 2 is empty

without having to re-set the key to only one dimension (because I am in a loop and I don't want to rest the keys every time).

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3  
There is good documentation of timings of common data.table operations (including subsetting) here: datatable.r-forge.r-project.org/datatable-timings.pdf –  BenBarnes May 20 '14 at 9:28
    
I looked at the doc paragraph 1.1 Extraction. It seems to me the extraction is not exactly subsetting unless one adds the nomatch option. Also this does not address the simulataneous 1 and 2-dimensional subsetting (see my update in question). –  tucson May 20 '14 at 9:34
    
@tucson These are two completely separate questions that require different answers, so they should probably have their own posts, but no matter. See stackoverflow.com/questions/15597685/… for a solution to your second question. –  MattLBeck May 20 '14 at 9:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

What's the fastest way to subset a data.table?

Using the binary search based subset feature is the fastest. Note that the subset requires the option nomatch = 0L so as to return only the matching results.

How to subset by one of the keys only with two keys set?

If you've two keys set on DT and you want to subset by the first key, then you can just provide the first value in J(.), no need to provide anything for the 2nd key. That is:

# will return all columns where the first key column matches 22
DT[J(22), nomatch=0L] 

If instead, you would like to subset by the second key, then you'll have to, as of now, provide all the unique values for the first key. That is:

# will return all columns where 2nd key column matches 2
DT[J(unique(V1), 2), nomatch=0L]

This is also shown in this SO post. Although I'd prefer that DT[J(, 2)] to work for this case, as that seems rather intuitive.

There's also a pending feature request, FR #1007 for implementing secondary keys, which when done would take care of this.

Here is a better example:

DT = data.table(c(1,2,3,4,5), c(2,3,2,3,2))
DT
#    V1 V2
# 1:  1  2
# 2:  2  3
# 3:  3  2
# 4:  4  3
# 5:  5  2
setkey(DT,V1,V2)
DT[J(unique(V1),2)]
#    V1 V2
# 1:  1  2
# 2:  2  2
# 3:  3  2
# 4:  4  2
# 5:  5  2
DT[J(unique(V1),2), nomatch=0L]
#    V1 V2
# 1:  1  2
# 2:  3  2
# 3:  5  2
DT[J(3), nomatch=0L]
#    V1 V2
# 1:  3  2

In summary:

# key(DT) = c("V1", "V2")

# data.frame                        |             data.table equivalent
# =====================================================================
# subset(DF, (V1 == 3) & (V2 == 2)) |            DT[J(3,2), nomatch=0L]
# subset(DF, (V1 == 3))             |              DT[J(3), nomatch=0L]
# subset(DF, (V2 == 2))             |  DT[J(unique(V1), 2), nomatch=0L]
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1  
Thank you Arun. –  tucson May 20 '14 at 13:45
1  
an important caveat to keep in mind is that for a single subset DT[V1 == 3 & V2 == 2] is going to be faster than setting the key and doing a binary search - so binary search only makes sense if the key is already set or you do multiple searches per setkey –  eddi May 20 '14 at 15:12

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