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I'm having following macro

#define GET_COUNT(model,hdr)  ((model == NEW) ? \
                              ((hdr)->val.count > 3 ? \
                              ((hdr)->val.count = 3) | (hdr)->val.count : \
                              (hdr)->val.count) :     \
                              (hdr)->val.count > 4 ?  \
                              ((hdr)->val.count = 4) | (hdr)->val.count : \
                               (hdr)->val.count) 

Above macro should work as follows

First it need to check for the model, if model is NEW it should check for count if count > 3 it should assign count as 3 and it return count else return count value as is. If model not equal to NEW, it should check for count > 4, if count > 4 it should assign count = 4 and return count else return count value as is.

Is above macro works as my expectation or do i need to change any thing?

My main concern is after assigning a value i'm using | operator to return count value is this works?

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5  
Why are you even using a macro for this ? It should be a function, and it should be written more clearly. – Paul R May 20 '14 at 9:47
2  
Why don't you write a sample program with this macro & pass some valid inputs & test the output? – anishsane May 20 '14 at 9:48
2  
Why even bother writing ((hdr)->val.count = 3) | (hdr)->val.count. The C standard specifies that an assignment evaluates to the value of the left hand operand after the assignment, ie: (hdr)->val.count = 3 evaluates to 3... – Elias Van Ootegem May 20 '14 at 9:53
    
@EliasVanOotegem Thanks man...Got it – Chinna May 20 '14 at 10:06
    
@anishsane not a good way of testing out undefined behaviour :) – M.M May 20 '14 at 11:01
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can translate the ternary operator a ? b : c to

if (a) {
    return b;
} else {
    return c;
}

Applied to your macro, you get

? GET_COUNT(? model, ? hdr)
{
    if (model == NEW) {
        if (hdr->val.count > 3) {
            return (hdr->val.count = 3) | hdr->val.count;
        else
            return hdr->val.count;
    } else {
        if (hdr->val.count > 4)
            return (hdr->val.count = 4) | hdr->val.count;
        else
            return hdr->val.count;
    }
}

In every branch, GET_COUNT returns hdr->val.count. Therefore, you can refactor this to

? GET_COUNT(? model, ? hdr)
{
    if (model == NEW) {
        if (hdr->val.count > 3) {
            hdr->val.count = 3;
    } else {
        if (hdr->val.count > 4)
            hdr->val.count = 4;
    }

    return hdr->val.count;
}
share|improve this answer

The code in this macro causes undefined behaviour. In the expression

((hdr)->val.count = 3) | (hdr)->val.count

you write the variable but also read it separately, without an intervening sequence point.

It's not exactly clear to me what your intention was in writing this expression, but this is all vastly inferior to using a function.

inline T check_max(T *value, T the_max)
{
    if ( *value > the_max )
        *value = the_max;

    return *value;
}

inline T get_count(MODEL model, HDR *hdr)
{
     return check_max(&hdr->val.count, model == MODEL_NEW ? 3 : 4);
}
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