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I am using a xml file as an embedded resource to load an XDocument. We are using the following code to get the appropriate file from the Assembly:

XDocument xd = new XDocument();
Assembly assembly = null;

try
{
    assembly = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly();
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    //Write exception to server event log
}

try
{
    if(assembly != null)
    {
        using(StreamReader sr = new 
            StreamReader(assembly.GetManifestResourceStream("assemblyPath")))
        {
            using(XmlTextReader xtr = new XmlTextReader(sr))
            {
                xd = XDocument.Load(xtr);
            }
        }
    }
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    //Write exception to server event log
}

So when the code is deployed, we occasionally will go to the page and nothing will be loaded from the embedded document. When we check the event log, there is no error. If the user just refreshes the page, it'll load fine. This has lead me to think that, for some reason, assembly = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly(); is ocassionally returning null, and the way the code is written this isn't an error. So, my question is why would Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly(); be returning null? I found a couple articles talking about there being errors sometimes with unmanaged code, but this application is written in C# and deployed via setup project.

The code was originally written without error avoidance code. It was added to keep the users from getting error screens. The exceptions are written to the event log of the server.

share|improve this question
    
A very stupid question (as I can't imaging GetExecutingAssembly failing in pure managed code): do errors happen (in any other piece of code) that cause an entry to be written to the event log ? I am asking just to be sure that the event log writing code is correct and that exceptions can be ruled out. –  Timores Mar 4 '10 at 0:34
    
Sorry, should have specified it a bit more. The catches are calling a method in a utility project to write the exception to the event log. The code to do so is used throughout the application and works. Also, the above code is in a method that is called during the page intialization. –  Nathan Mar 4 '10 at 1:42
    
So, after seeing that everyone seems to agree that GetExecutingAssembly() will not return null, I went back and and looked at the rest of the method. After some searching I found this article on MSDN: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/xc4235zt(VS.85).aspx. In it is says GetManifestResourceStream() can return null if the resource isn't found or is inaccessible. Returning null to the using() construct wouldn't cause an exception. So we're going to deploy this and see if it's the culprit. –  Nathan Mar 4 '10 at 19:22
    
I hope that by "deploy" you mean "deploy a test version, to a test machine, using a test server", and that you are not in fact doing production pushes for "smoke tests" as the last comment seems to imply. Next time your users start getting exceptions, I recommend fixing the bug that caused them instead of just suppressing the notification. –  Aaronaught Mar 4 '10 at 20:31
    
By "deploy" I mean it will go through another QA cycle. So far the issue has only been seen in production code though, so I doubt that will change now. As for fixing the bug, that's what I'm trying to do now. –  Nathan Mar 4 '10 at 23:25

6 Answers 6

This is a perfect example of why it's an almost universally bad idea to eat exceptions, especially the top-level System.Exception. The problem could be anywhere; more likely than not, the real problem is in your logging code.

Take out those empty catch blocks (or rethrow inside them with throw;) and see where the exception is really occurring. And once you find the real problem and rewrite your code, rewrite it to catch only exceptions that you actually know how to handle.

GetExecutingAssembly will not return null, period.

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go to the properties of the file whose path is mentioned and change the buildAction from content which is the default one to EmbeddedResource. Recompile and it should work.

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You are up the creek with the wrong paddle, GetExecutingAssembly() never returns null. Proof it to yourself by removing all the error avoidance code, including the null check. Getting occasional failure is usually a threading issue.

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I believe that's "up the creek without a paddle." :P –  Aaronaught Mar 4 '10 at 2:19
    
Getting that wrong was quite intentional :) –  Hans Passant Mar 4 '10 at 2:37

When faced with a situation like this I try to really prove that the value returned was null. Try this:

try
{
    assembly = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly();
    Log.Write("Executing assembly is null: " + (assembly == null))
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    //Write exception to server event log
}

I suspect it will always write "false", and something else is actually the problem - perhaps something you didn't include in your code snippet.

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This could be one of the reasons - http://winterdom.com/2003/04/assemblygetexecutingassembly

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That can return null if you are launching your code from an unmanaged application (e.g. the NUnit Test runner): Try the following using the console:

[Test]
public void att()
{
    Assert.NotNull(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly());
}

Seeing as you've tagged it embedded, I'm guessing you're using some sort of bootloader, or interpreter to run your .Net app? That would probably be unmanaged (i.e. not .Net interpretted) and hence would return null.

See the documentation, section "Remarks: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.reflection.assembly.getentryassembly.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Not that anyone's going to look at it now :/ –  chrisb Mar 13 '14 at 0:48

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