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I created a new non-sudo user(user1) in vagrant(Ubuntu 12.04 OS), and added the insecure public key to the user1 authorised key file. In vagrant file, added the default user as "user1" :

config.ssh.default.username = "user1"

Now vagrant up is failing with following error message:

The following SSH command responded with a non-zero exit status.
Vagrant assumes that this means the command failed!

mkdir -p /vagrant

Stdout from the command:

Stderr from the command:

sudo: no tty present and no askpass program specified
Sorry, try again.
sudo: no tty present and no askpass program specified
Sorry, try again.
sudo: no tty present and no askpass program specified
Sorry, try again.
sudo: 3 incorrect password attempts

But if am setting the sudo user for default user, then vagrant up is successful. Can anyone help me with the changes I need to do to enable vagrant up for non-sudo users.

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Why would you like to avoid sudo on the VM? –  tmatilai May 20 at 19:51
    
Because I don't want the default user to have access to files and folders of another user(as sudo users can access everything using the sudo command.) –  user2846870 May 21 at 4:43
    
What other users? If you want to install or configure anything in the guest machine you need root access. And if not, why to use Vagrant at all? Just create and spin up the VM directly. –  tmatilai May 21 at 6:47
    
I have 2 users, one default user(non-sudo), another privileged user(sudo user).The default user should hav elimited access and should be able to execute "vagrant up" command –  user2846870 May 21 at 13:37
    
As I said in my answer, vagrant up on the host does not require sudo permissions. But the "vagrant" user on the guest VM needs them. –  tmatilai May 21 at 13:46

1 Answer 1

Vagrant requires root/sudo permissions on the VM for almost all of it's operations; like configuring the networking, mounting shared folders, running provisioners, etc. So you wouldn't get very useful VM without sudo even if you managed to avoid it.

Note that you only need sudo access on the guest. Vagrant commands itself can (and should) be run as a non-root user on the host.

share|improve this answer
    
So how about providing required access alone(by editing /etc/sudoers) to this default user? Then what all privileges should be given to the default user?.. –  user2846870 May 21 at 4:59
    
Depends on the Vagrant version, guest OS, your configuration, plugins, etc. You just have to find out (from auth logs) if you really need to go this way. –  tmatilai May 21 at 7:04
    
If I am commentting config.vm.network :public_network and disabling shared folder, vagrant up is getting executed without any error. But vagrant halt is giving follwoing error –  user2846870 May 22 at 11:52
    
If I am commenting "config.vm.network :public_network" in Vagrantfile and disabling shared folder, vagrant up is getting executed without any error. But vagrant halt is giving error: "Vagrant assumes that this means the command failed! shutdown -h now". –  user2846870 May 22 at 11:58
    
Even if am using "config.vm.network :public_network" in Vagrantfile after adding access to non-sudo user "user1" to /etc/network/interfaces and /etc/init.d/networking,vagrant up is giving error: "The following SSH command responded with a non-zero exit status. Vagrant assumes that this means the command failed! sed -e '/^#VAGRANT-BEGIN/,/^#VAGRANT-END/ d' /etc/network/interfaces > /tmp/vagrant-network-interfaces" –  user2846870 May 22 at 12:00

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