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I'm currently refactoring some code and I keep finding blocks like the one below:

for (int i = 0; i < NumSortThreads; i++) {
        logger.info("Starting sorting thread " + (i) + "/"
                + NumSortThreads + "... ");
        sorter = new FooSorter(batchQueue, fooQue, RsaveQueue,
                minSamples);
        Sorter = new Thread(sorter);
        Sorter.start();
    }

Can you reuse a thread object in this manner? It's important as later I go to terminate the thread (using one of the object's methods) and I'm not sure if it will actually kill all of the spawned threads.

I can't find any documentation on the matter but from what I know of Java I would assume that each time new Thread(obj) is called, it's killing the previous thread. This is partially based off the fact that I know java provides another object for Thread Groups (which is what the original author was probably going for).

Does this code produce NumSortThreads threads? Or does produce only one due to repeat instantiation?

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2  
You're not reusing it. You're spawning a new thread every iteration (which the new keyword indicates). Instantiating a new Thread does absolutely nothing to the Thread that you spawned. –  user3580294 May 20 at 16:29
1  
So in other words, this code will spawn NumSortThreads threads. –  user3580294 May 20 at 16:30
    
So if I were to call sorter.terminate() (a method that gets the object to stop processing) would it successfully kill all Sorter threads? –  ahjohnston25 May 20 at 16:31
    
Depends on how it's implemented, but I'm guessing that it'll kill a single thread at most. I'm going to expand on this in an answer. –  user3580294 May 20 at 16:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code is reusing a variable Sorter, not the thread objects referenced by it. Once you re-assign the variable

Sorter = new Thread(sorter);

it starts referencing a new thread object, and stops referencing the old thread.

So if I were to call sorter.terminate() (a method that gets the object to stop processing) would it successfully kill all Sorter threads?

No, since each thread object has its individual FooSorter assigned to it in the constructor

sorter = new FooSorter(batchQueue, fooQue, RsaveQueue, minSamples);
Sorter = new Thread(sorter); // <<== each thread gets a new FooSorter

this would terminate only the last thread. If you would like to terminate all threads, you need to put them in a collection, and call terminate in the same way that you created them, i.e. in a loop.

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Thank you! I feared as much; oh well, I guess I'm gonna be busy tonight. –  ahjohnston25 May 20 at 17:27

Can you reuse a thread object in this manner? It's important as later I go to terminate the thread (using one of the object's methods) and I'm not sure if it will actually kill all of the spawned threads.

You are not reusing the thread object. You are simply reusing reference of type Thread. Note that since you are reusing the reference there will not be any references to previous thread object and is free to be GCed.

Does this code produce NumSortThreads threads? Or does produce only one due to repeat instantiation?

This would create NumSortThreads thread. But at a given point of time do not expect that many to run because as I said with no live references they will be GCed.

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