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Any way to use nginx (1.6.0) to limit requests by verb?

For example, allow a maximum of 15 GETs per second but only 3 POSTs per second for any one ip address?

Currently trying to use the following gives an error in the nginx error log of:

2014/05/20 16:24:39 [emerg] 1914#0: "limit_req" directive is not allowed here in /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/site.conf:13

site.conf Included inside http block.

# Rate limiting
limit_req_zone $binary_remote_addr zone=get_requests:10m rate=15r/s;
limit_req_zone $binary_remote_addr zone=post_requests:10m rate=3r/s;
limit_req_status 429;

server {
  listen 4000;

  # Rate limiting
  limit_req zone=get_requests;
  if ($request_method = 'POST') {
    limit_req zone=post_requests;
  }

  location / {
  }
}

Edit 1

I've also tried inserting the following conditional break clause after location / but that doesn't work as the system is limited to 1 request per second:

limit_req zone=get_requests;
if ($request_method != 'POST') {
  break;
}
limit_req zone=post_requests;
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1 Answer 1

Try something like this.

If $request_method is POST, return a number code ("588" in this example), which will be handled by the named location @postrequests to limit it.

# Rate limiting
limit_req_zone $binary_remote_addr zone=get_requests:10m rate=15r/s;
limit_req_zone $binary_remote_addr zone=post_requests:10m rate=3r/s;
limit_req_status 429;

server {
    listen 4000;

    error_page 588 = @postrequests;


    if ($request_method = 'POST') {
        return 588;
    }

   location / {

       limit_req zone=get_requests burst=0;

       # the usual stuff..
   }
   location @postrequests {

       limit_req zone=post_requests burst=0;

       # the usual stuff..
   }
}
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