Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I have some class, e.g. Foo:

public class Foo {
    private Integer x;
    private Integer y;

    public Foo(Integer x, Integer y) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }


    public String toString() {
        return x + " " + y;
    }
}

Now, I wish to add a constructor which takes as its argument a string representing a Foo, e.g. Foo("1 2") would construct a Foo with x=1 and y=2. Since I don't want to duplicate the logic in the original constructor, I would like to be able to do something like this:

public Foo(string stringRepresentation) {
    Integer x;
    Integer y;

    // ...
    // Process the string here to get the values of x and y.
    // ...

    this(x, y);
}

However, Java does not allow statements before the call to this(x, y). Is there some accepted way of working around this?

share|improve this question
    
why must you call this(x, y)? why not just set x and y explicitly? –  kgrad Mar 4 '10 at 3:46
1  
As I mentioned in the original question, I wish to avoid duplicating the logic in the existing constructor. Say for example I want to add some kind of validation later, I would then only have to modify the original constructor instead of both. –  verdesmarald Mar 4 '10 at 4:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This particular case is kind of awkward because of the two values, but what you can do is call a static method.

  public Foo(Integer x, Integer y) {
      this(new Integer[]{x, y});
  }

  public Foo(String xy) {
      this(convertStringToIntegers(xy));
  }

  private Foo(Integer[] xy) {
      this.x = xy[0];
      this.y = xy[1];
  }

  private static Integer[] convertStringToIntegers(String xy) {
      Integer[] result;
      //Do what you have to do...
      return result;
  }

That being said, if this class doesn't need to be subclassed, it would be clearer and better and more idomatic to leave the constructors all private and have a public static factory method:

  public static Foo createFoo(String xy) {
       Integer x;
       Integer y;
        //etc.
        return new Foo(x, y);
  }
share|improve this answer
    
The second option is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  verdesmarald Mar 4 '10 at 4:25

Anothe option would be, you can think of having a static factory method that takes a String argument and returns an instance of Foo. This is similar to the approach used by valueOf(String s) method in Integer class.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Factory methods are definitely a good solution to working around many of the inflexibilities of constructors. –  Chris Jester-Young Mar 4 '10 at 3:50

Create a method that does takes care of the initialization required in both constructors and call that instead of this(...).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.